AAVLD’s Survey Of Pet Food-Induced Nephrotoxicity

AAVLD Survey

The American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) has released the results of their “AAVLD survey of pet food-induced nephrotoxicity in North America, April to June 2007″.

The AAVLD survey found 347 cases that met diagnostic criteria for “pet food-induced nephrotoxicity” from April 5-June 6. There were 235 cats and 112 dogs, with 61 percent of the cats and 74 percent of the dogs having died.

Dr. Wilson Rumbeiha, associate professor at the Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health, organized the results of the AAVLD survey. He said cats and small-medium sized dogs were more affected because of their small sizes.

Rumbeiha stated that if both melamine and cyanuric acid are present in pet food, they can combine to form crystals in animal bodies. He added that the prevailing theory for how cyanuric acid, ammelide, and ammeline tainted pet food is that they were co-contaminants. Incomplete reactions during melamine production could lead to the formation of these co-contaminants.

In the AAVLD survey, the cases of four cats and one dog were further studied to form a preliminary case definition. All five animals had eaten food that was recalled because of melamine contamination. The kidney or urine tests from each animal were positive for the presence of one or more of the four contaminants. The animals had high concentrations of BUN and creatinine.

The most common finding was yellow-brown crystals in the renal distal tubules and collecting ducts. Signs of chronic interstitial nephritis were also common.

Recent studies from other laboratories on both cats and pigs suggest that the combination of melamine and cyanuric acid are more toxic and fatal than either is individually.

Source: AVMA

(Thanks menusux)

10 Responses to “AAVLD’s Survey Of Pet Food-Induced Nephrotoxicity”

  1. Lynne says:

    What? You mean more than 16 pets died?

    ‘k, snark off.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Note that this is a study from recalled food. What about those that have not been recalled?

  3. Katie says:

    What about the pets (both cats and dogs) who were sick or who died and the veternarians didn’t link these to recalled or non-recalled food.

    I think it would be of interest to the data gathers to gather all data from all laboratories that tested samples (urine and blood) from pets (sick or those who died) and see how the data compares to previous years. What kindof increases were there in abnormal kidney function and/or liver function tests.

    Katie

  4. Abby Kelleyite says:

    The emerging published toxicology info on the synergistic effects of melamine and cyanuric acid might just call for a revisiting of last May’s human risk assessment Interim Melamine and Analogues Safety/Risk Assessment/a> and its assumptions, which were much criticized at the time.

  5. Anonymous says:

    The results from Oct. to March are?

  6. MaineMom says:

    Neither melamine or cyanuric acid belong in ANY food - human or pet!

  7. furmom says:

    I’m also thinking of all the pet owners whose pets died or got sick, but no one was on to the pet food angle at that time. If my cat suddenly died, I wouldn’t necessarily go to the expense of having the vet determine what caused it. Older cats might just be presumed to die of old age, when it was urinary, or normal urinary problems were diagnosed when they were actually food caused. Looking at previous years might be relevent, but some of the suppliers said they had been putting melamine in the food for years, so who knows how many animals might have been affected then. My cat had a urinary problem about a year before, I know I had switched him to some different dry food which I can’t remember. I just took him in because he skipped a meal and didn’t seem happy, I wouldn’t normally take an pet in just for that. He was already very critical and would have died soon, but the vet gave him the full treatment and he made it. As long as he stayed on a raw meat diet after that he was fine. He wouldn’t eat the special food from the vet, which is good because the one prescribed for him later turned out to be one of the recalled foods. He wouldn’t have survived a second go around with urinary problems. He’s been fine ever since. We dodged the bullet, but I’m too afraid to feed any commercial stuff to my cat or dog. All our other cats never ate commercial food and we’ve never had another cat with a urinary problem. Why wouldn’t I think there’s a connection?The kibble I used on and off for the dog before was also recalled. Fortunately the dog had been more off it than on. I really think there are easily way more animals that got sick and recovered, or died, and it was put down to other causes.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Possibly more clues:

    http://www.stanford.edu/~jpc/Chapter1.htm

  9. Anonymous says:

    http://www.truthinlabeling.org/organicP.html

  10. plut0 » AAVLD’s Survey Of Pet Food-Induced Nephrotoxicity says:

    […] Check it out! While looking through the blogosphere we stumbled on an interesting post today.Here’s a quick excerpt The American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) has released the results of their “AAVLD survey of pet food-induced nephrotoxicity in North America, April to June 2007″. The AAVLD survey found 347 cases that met diagnostic criteria for “pet food-induced nephrotoxicity” from April 5-June 6. There were 235 cats and 112 dogs, with 61 percent of the cats and 74 percent of the dogs having died. Dr. Wilson Rumbeiha, associate professor at the Michigan State University Dia […]


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