AVMA Releases Statement In Regards To Lead In Pet Toys

Cat NipThe American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recently released a statement about labs finding lead in pet toys.

Here is the press release:

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is concerned about recent reports of lead contamination in toys.

Independent tests by Trace Laboratories, Inc. in Illinois and ExperTox Analytical Laboratories in Texas have both found the presence of lead and other toxic chemicals on randomly selected toys purchased in American stores. The highest level of lead found was 30,000 parts per million (ppm) in the paint on a pet toy. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) enforces a federal standard for lead in paint intended for children’s products, which is 600 ppm, according to CPSC spokesperson Ed Kang, but there is no federal standard for lead in pet toys.

Dr. Mike Murphy, a veterinary toxicologist at the University of Minnesota, said that owners should be careful about lead exposure in pets, but warns that there are far more toxic sources of lead in many households. Old, lead paint is roughly 30 to 40 percent lead and can still be found in some older homes. Solder, fishing weights, curtain weights, and some older molded-metal toys may be made entirely of lead and should be kept out of reach from pets and children.

“If your pet is chewing and swallowing a toy then maybe that’s not something you should allow the animal to play with,” Dr. Murphy said.

Dr. Frederick Oehme, professor of toxicology and diagnostic medicine at Kansas State University, said symptoms of lead poisoning are vague in pets but can include a slightly anorexic appearance and a slight loss of appetite, slight behavior changes that include twitching, and whining while sleeping. In more advanced cases of lead poisoning, there are neurological symptoms that include mild to severe seizures. Dr. Oehme said if symptoms are present in your pet, consult your veterinarian for a diagnosis.

“Veterinarians are in a very unique position because, when they see lead poisoning in a pet, the veterinarian can then ask if other members of the family—particularly children—have been checked for lead poisoning since they live in the same environment,” he said. “I’ve seen a dog that tested with high levels of lead … from lead soldering, and, when the owner was tested for lead, he also had high blood levels of lead.”

Dr. Steven Hansen, director of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal’s Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), which operates a hotline that serves all of North America, said that the APCC has received over 200,000 calls over the last two years and none were related to a toy causing in lead poisoning in a pet. Dr. Hansen said that while there is little research on the cognitive or behavioral impact of long term exposure to low lead concentrations in pets, as exists in humans, the use of lead-based paint is inappropriate on any toy.

“To reassure pet owners, we encourage manufacturers to test pet products for lead and other contaminants and post findings on their corporate websites,” Dr. Hansen said.

Dr. Murphy advises that the best place for information on lead in pet toys is your veterinarian. He or she can offer expert advice on animal health or direct you to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory to have a toy tested if deemed necessary. Veterinary diagnostic laboratories can also be located through the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians at http://www.aavld.org/mc/page.do.

Source: AVMA

(Thanks menusux)

12 Responses to “AVMA Releases Statement In Regards To Lead In Pet Toys”

  1. Carol says:

    I still wonder why we are being directed to AAVLD labs—I don’t believe either lab mentioned in this press release are–as far as I can tell by the website info. Trace labs and ExperTox are two labs we all need to kkep in mind for other testings as well.

  2. Claudia says:

    Why is ExperTox a legitimate authority on the detection of lead, yet is being raked over the coals in its detection of Acetaminophen? Morons.

  3. Velvet's Dad says:

    Claudia, you are so right.

  4. Katie says:

    I’m glad the AVMA is finally addressing the high levels of lead in pet toys and how it not only is a concern for the pets but the human household as well.

    Makes one wonder….reading what symptoms lead causes in pets if it maybe the reason pet parents have seen an increase in seizures in their pets over the years. And we all talk about how our pets seem to have shorter life spans, can’t help but wonder if it’s not a result of all the toxic chemicals in toys and food.

    Katie

  5. Krista says:

    Yes, it is quite interesting that AVMA accepts the lab reports from Expertox for lead detection as accurate - but consistantly refutes the numerous acetaminophen findings.

  6. Velvet's Dad says:

    I agree with Claudia, completely.

  7. Velvet's Dad says:

    I fully agree with Claudia.

  8. Velvet's Dad says:

    Sorry about the duplicates, this has been malfunctioning.

  9. Cheryl Wrona says:

    Since dead pets are part of the pet food supply it could be how it gets in the food supply. Acetaminophen will kill a cat and in high doses do harm to dogs. If you do not see any meat as an ingredient in pet food it has none. By products are just that, everything else but meat. One might want to read the book,”Foods pets die for.” These pet foods are cheap for a reason. Also get into the FDA website and read about what is allowed in pet food and how little they regulate it. Those rendering places stink for a reason.

  10. Lynn says:

    Two comments:

    ~ Those toxic chemical test kits that you can buy in the hardware store do not always give accurate readings.

    ~ Something I learned during the pet food recall when I sent food to two separate labs to be tested: there are certain FDA lab testing protocols that need to be followed in testing for a specific toxin. The theory is that if everyone uses the same method of testing, then everyone should be on the same page.

    In my experience, the two labs [one in LaJolla and one in Texas] were waiting on FDA “guidelines” to be published for the detection of some of the toxins. So I’m wondering if the reason why ExperTox’s findings for acetaminophen are being refuted is because POSSIBLY ExperTox’s test protocol is different than the one being used by others. Just a wild guess.

  11. Shirley Connelly says:

    Ladies and Gentlemen, My solution wpuld be to hit them all in the pocket, don’t buy any pet food or products at all. make your own food, and toys. buy meat from your local butcher, get a knuckle bone from him for your dog. my cat loves to play with the plastic tops from milk bottles. and balls made from yarn. I go way back. they didn’t sell dog toys or cat toys. we made them ourselfs. walk your dogs go to the park let them chase sticks or balls. they will be healthy and happy for a long time. Question your vet why does the dogs need so may shots every year? its the same as going to your own doctor. Why so may tests? think about it.
    granny in conn.

  12. Shirley Connelly says:

    Ladies and Gentlemen, My solutionwould be to hit them all in the pocket, don’t buy any pet food or products at all. make your own food, and toys. buy meat from your local butcher, get a knuckle bone from him for your dog. my cat loves to play with the plastic tops from milk bottles. and balls made from yarn. I go way back. they didn’t sell dog toys or cat toys. we made them ourselfs. walk your dogs go to the park let them chase sticks or balls. they will be healthy and happy for a long time. Question your vet why does the dogs need so may shots every year? its the same as going to your own doctor. Why so may tests? think about it.
    granny in conn.


Close
E-mail It