ChemNutra CEO: Rat Poison Never Found in Wheat Gluten, Cuts Ties With Supplier

ChemNutra, the US broker of wheat gluten, sent us an email about their reactions and a timeline related to the pet food recall.

Interesting items from the ChemNutra timeline:

  1. Aminopterin (rat poison) identified in Menu Foods products was never found in the wheat gluten. So where did it come from?
  2. Menu Foods told them they were changing wheat gluten suppliers because of “water absorption factor”, not because of contamination.
  3. Menu Foods suspected 4 toxins for more than a week before issuing the recall.

Email highlights are below:

We are appalled and distressed that Menu Foods took so long to recall its products, although it clearly suspected there was a problem for weeks prior to the first recall. And it wasn’t until eight days before they issued their first recall that Menu Foods told us that wheat gluten was one of many ingredients it was investigating… We had no idea that melamine was an issue until being notified by the FDA on March 29. In fact, we had never heard of melamine before… We assure you that we will never again do business with the supplier of the suspect wheat gluten, XuZhou Anying Biologic Technology Development Co. Ltd.

Entire letter after the jump. The timeline they referenced is here.

Dear Pet Owners, Pet Food Businesses & all who love animals:

We at ChemNutra want to express our support and condolences for pet owners whose cats have fallen ill or died as the probable result of contaminated pet food
produced by Menu Foods, as well as pet owners throughout North America who have become fearful about their pets’ food following news of the contamination. We also offer our empathy for the difficulties imposed on pet food businesses that were negatively impacted by this situation.

The possibility that any animal fell ill or died because of an ingredient we may have supplied to Menu Foods saddens us and also angers us because it means that
ChemNutra has victimized as well, by our own supplier. In fact, news reports and congressional testimony provide increasing evidence of this possibility.

We are appalled and distressed that Menu Foods took so long to recall its products, although it clearly suspected there was a problem for weeks prior to the first
recall. And it wasn’t until eight days before they issued their first recall that Menu Foods told us that wheat gluten was one of many ingredients it was investigating.

Moreover, here at ChemNutra, we are concerned that we may have been the victim of deliberate and mercenary contamination for the purpose of making the wheat gluten we purchased appear to have a higher protein content than it did, because melamine causes a false high result on protein tests. We had no idea that melamine was an issue until being notified by the FDA on March 29. In fact, we had never heard of melamine before. It’s simply not a chemical even on the radar screen for food ingredient suppliers. You can find more information on the timeline of events that occurred since late February here.

We assure you that we will never again do business with the supplier of the suspect wheat gluten, XuZhou Anying Biologic Technology Development Co. Ltd.
XuZhou Anying had been recommended to us by a long-time reliable source in China, and presented what appeared to be legitimate proof that its product was safe. We hope that U.S. and Chinese government investigations of XuZhou Anying reveal what actually occurred.

ChemNutra has an excellent record of compliance with all applicable regulations, but please know that as additional product safety recommendations are developed by the FDA, the Pet Food Institute and our customers, we will implement them immediately.

Steve Miller
CEO
ChemNutra

37 Responses to “ChemNutra CEO: Rat Poison Never Found in Wheat Gluten, Cuts Ties With Supplier”

  1. Endaar says:

    So just to summarize a few interesting points:

    Menu finds out about contamination on 2/20. CEO Mark Weins sells $102,000 worth of stock on 2/26 and 2/27. He was “prohibited from trading until Feb. 16 because of a blackout period related to the company’s fourth-quarter results,” so it’s not as if he sold the stock immediately after being able to do so.

    Yeah, it’s a coincidence. Sure.

    Endaar

  2. menusux says:

    http://www.chemnutra.com/ChemNutra%20Timeline.pdf

    The ChemNutra Timeline references Menu’s suspect toxins March 8-EXACTLY what they entered in their FAQ’s for April 11–see links below–

    http://www.menufoods.com/recall/

    Frequently Asked Questions For Consumers
    Last Updated: April 11, 2007

    http://www.menufoods.com/recal.....0%2007.htm

    10. Are there other ways my pet might get sick and show similar symptoms?

    Yes – antifreeze ingestion, certain rodenticides and some medications. Certain lilies have been shown to cause kidney failure if consumed by cats. Grapes have been reported to cause kidney failure in dogs and may affect cats. Physical damage from trauma and cancerous conditions can also cause kidney damage.

    See post under Update Thursday for the similarities in what happened in North America and what occurred around the same time in South Africa (and may be recurring again). The toxin found in South Africa was ethylene glycol when the February-March tragedies happened there.

    When I read the Menu FAQ posted on their website on April 11, I had plenty of suspicions re: their trying to push the blame onto anything other than their foods, but until now, there was nothing one could pin those suspicions on. With the release of the ChemNutra letter, it sounds like Menu’s REALLY been shuffling harder than we thought to shift the blame.

  3. CatLady says:

    Menusux has a point. And all of this finger-pointing is giving me a headache. “He said! She said!” because no one wants to take responsibility for quality control. XuZhou Anying didn’t check the quality before they shipped it. CheNutra did’t check the quality of what they were distributing. Menu didn’t check the quality of what they were putting into pet food. Menu didn’t check the quality of the pet food that was being produced. The buck stops where? With sick and dead pets. There is negligence all the way through the food chain.

  4. catherine pierson says:

    sounds like katrina all over again!

  5. Martha says:

    CatLady says:
    “…responsibility for quality control. XuZhou Anying didn’t check the quality before they shipped it. CheNutra did’t check the quality of what they were distributing. Menu didn’t check the quality of what they were putting into pet food. Menu didn’t check the quality of the pet food that was being produced. The buck stops where? With sick and dead pets. There is negligence all the way through the food chain.”

    Maybe they all DID check the quality. Maybe all quality control checks didn’t find anything out of the ordinary at each/every level because the quality was as it was already KNOWN to be? (Read to mean: Everyone KNEW exactly what was in the products and accepted it as “standard” quality. From start to finish.)

    Is it possible that the “other” suspected “toxins” come from GM grain products? (Possibly even manufactured in the US “for human consumption”?)

    The more evasive the government or corporate “investigation” appears, the more we speculate why they are sitting on vital life and death information.

  6. Pet Connection Blog » Pet food recall:Friday night round-up says:

    […] he has been all along, Ben at itchmo.com is all over the timeline, and has a few interesting points about the ChemNutra timeline in […]

  7. 5CatMom says:

    ITCHMO,

    Regarding your headline, ChemNutra CEO: Rat Poison Never Found in Wheat Gluten

    I’m having some trouble with the word “never”. Doesn’t the word “never’ mean “not at any time.”

    According to Breitbart.com, the Guelph lab, “Experts at Ontario’s University of Guelph detected aminopterin in some samples of the recalled pet food, but only in very small percentages”.

    http://www.breitbart.com/artic....._article=1

    Also, there was a subsequent newspaper article in which Guelph “stood behind their findings”. I’ll find the article and send a link.

    Clearly these are two different stories. Would love to know which one is correct.

    You may recall that some of my posts have involved concerns about findings of aminopterin in wheat because, based on what I’ve read (need to be very careful here, ’cause I’m no expert), that aminopterin is a marker for GMO wheat.

    And even though I’m not an expert on GMO wheat, I DO KNOW that I don’t want it in the food supply, but that’s just me.

    It makes sense to me that a China company may have (not saying they did) bought up some of the stuff (the European countries don’t want it) and laced it with MELAMINE.

    I mean, why throw away tons of perfectly good GM wheat gluten when you can dump it on the US pet food industry. Every one knows those guys don’t do adequate testing, right?

    The scarey thing is that I thought (may be wrong) that ChemNutra imported the gluten as “food grade”, meaning human food grade.

    ITCHMO ADMIN: I believe the release is saying that the rat poison was never traced back to the wheat gluten. That it appeared somewhere between the raw materials arriving at the factory and the final food made.

  8. 5CatMom says:

    Thanks,

    ITCHMO, You’re right about the link, my mistake. I’m confused (and probably should retire for the evening). Have their been findings of aminopterin in the gluten?

  9. Martin says:

    ChemNutra should have never purchased the wheat gluten from China in the first place. They are trying to pass the blame when they are at as much fault as XuZhou Anying, Menu Foods & the companies that put their name on the cans. They are all at fault! Along with who ever decided to allow China to bring this junk in.

  10. Jonathan says:

    I think there is enough blame to go around. ChemNutra is just as liable as the rest of them.

    Notice how they said they wouldn’t stop using chinese suppliers to import raw ingredients from.

    Still unacceptable.

  11. 5CatMom says:

    Don’t know about you, but I’ll need to see ChemNutra’s actual test report on the gluten.

    Would have been helpful if they’d attached the test report to ITCHMO’s letter.

    Sometimes test findings of “trace amounts within normal limits” are interpreted as “none”.

    The aminopterin came from a source. What was the source?

  12. Loretta Anderson says:

    I will never believe any of them , ever. Especially China. China has been not responding to our Government’s questions, instead, China has said they do not import ANY wheat gluten to the US. Typical communist rhetoric.
    I don’t trust China, I don’t trust communists. I don’t trust the US pet food industry. The damage is done and I will spend as much time as I can to boycott Red China, buy from local growers, eat whole foods and pass this on to as many people as I can!! THE ABSOLUTE SCARIEST PART OF THIS IS THAT THEY ARE CHECKING WITH THE CDC TO SEE IF RENAL FAILURE HAS INCREASED AMONG THE HUMAN POPULATION!! TRANSLATION, THE FDA KNOWS THAT IT IS IN THE HUMAN FOOD SUPPLY!!

  13. Eileen says:

    Nothing to do with the recall - but my computer had four “seize” attempts this morning, luckily blocked by my firewall. Checked the log to trace the place the “control seize” was coming from, and of all places….it was PEKING, CHINA! How ironic!

  14. Lynn says:

    AMINOPTERIN REFERENCE [referred to in CATMOM5 posting of 04-13-2007 at 9:23PM]

    To CATMOM5: Is this the reference you’re referring to:

    http://edition.cnn.com/2007/US.....index.html

    CNN deactivates many of its links, so I’ve pasted the article below. For verification of his statement you can contract Patrick Hooker, NY State Agricultural Commissioner, re his statement of 03-23-2007.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    “Rat poison found in pet food, official says”

    POSTED: 1932 GMT (0332 HKT), March 23, 2007
    Story Highlights• Rat poison identified as aminopterin found in pet food
    • Substance also used to treat cancer
    • Class-action lawsuit filed against manufacturer
    • Recall announced March 16 after cats and dogs suffer renal failure

    ALBANY, New York (AP) — Rat poison was found in the pet food suspected of causing kidney failure that killed at least 16 cats and dogs, but scientists still don’t know how it got there, state officials said Friday.

    The toxin was identified as aminopterin, which is used to kill rats in some countries, state Agriculture Commissioner Patrick Hooker said.

    Aminopterin is not registered for killing rodents in the United States, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, though it is used as a cancer drug. State officials wouldn’t speculate on how the toxin got into Menu Foods’ now-recalled pet food but said no criminal investigations had been launched. (Watch why devastated pet owners are suing )

    Scientists at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell and at the New York State Food Laboratory tested three cat food samples provided by Menu Foods and found Aminopterin in two of them. Hooker said they would be testing individual components of the pet food, as well.

    “Any amount of this product is too much in food,” he said.

    Aminopterin, also used as a cancer drug, is highly toxic in high doses. It inhibits the growth of malignant cells and suppresses the immune system. In dogs and cats, it can cause kidney failure, according to Donald Smith, dean of Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

    The Food and Drug Administration has said the investigation in the pet deaths was focusing on wheat gluten in the pet food. Wheat gluten itself would not cause kidney failure, but the common ingredient could have been contaminated, the FDA said.

    The pet deaths led to a recall of 60 million cans and pouches of pet food produced by Menu Foods and sold throughout North America under 95 brand names. There have been several reports of kidney failure in pets that ate the recalled brands, and the company has confirmed the deaths of 15 cats and one dog.

    Menu Foods last week recalled “cuts and gravy” style dog and cat food. The recall sparked concern among pet owners across North America. It includes food sold under store brands carried by Wal-Mart, Kroger, Safeway and other large retailers, as well as private labels such as Iams, Nutro and Eukanuba.

    The company’s chief executive and president said Menu Foods delayed announcing the recall until it could confirm that the animals had eaten its product before dying. Two earlier complaints from consumers whose cats had died involved animals that lived outside or had access to a garage, which left open the possibility they had been poisoned by something other than contaminated food, he said.

    Menu Foods planned a media teleconference for later Friday, a spokesman said. The company is majority owned by Menu Foods Income Fund of Streetsville. The company also makes foods for zoo cats, but those products are unaffected by the recall.

    A spokesman for New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said he was not aware of any criminal investigation involving the tainted food. FBI spokesman Paul Holstein in Albany said Friday he was not aware of any FBI involvement in the case.

    “I don’t know where we’ll go from here,” he said.

    A complete list of the recalled products along with product codes, descriptions and production dates was posted online by Menu Foods. The company also designated two phone numbers that pet owners could call for information: (866) 463-6738 and (866) 895-2708.

    New York State is home to two laboratories that are part of federal emergency lab networks, created after the September 11 terrorist attacks to keep the nation’s animals and food supply safe.

    The New York State Food Laboratory is part of the Federal Food Emergency Response Network and is capable of running a number of toxin tests on food, including the test that identified aminopterin.

    Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  15. Lynn says:

    CHEMNEUTRA TEST REPORT

    Just speculation, but it seems to me that all ChemNeutra would have in the way of any test reports would be whatever the Chinese firm provided ChemNeutra with. And who knows how valid that would be? I would tend to doubt that the importer, ChemNeutra, actually sent biochemists out to check the incoming product before it was shipped to Menu Foods. Am I wrong?

    BTW - when the product came into Long Beach, CA from China, after it got on the loading dock, where did it go next? To Las Vegas? Some storage/distribution point? Straight to Menu Foods. [I am trying to decipher all the stops the product man once it left Xozhou Anying’s facility…..starting with the first stop it made in China, and every stop it made, up to its arrival at Menu Foods.]

    Out of curiosity: Is it legal to use aminopterin in Canada?

    And Steve Miller, if you’re reading this: I’ve been asking and asking this question on the message boards [to no one in particular] and still have not received an answer: DOES ANYONE KNOW IF LIJUN MAO AT THE XUZHOU ANYING PLANT IS ONE AND THE SAME DR. LIJUN MAO FORMERLY OF PLANET POLYMER IN SAN DIEGO, CA??? Or is this a coincidence?

  16. Lynn says:

    I went a-sleuthing to validate that aminopterin in legal for use in Canada. Came across this site: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/en.....dese.shtml
    The second paragraph reads:

    “NOTE: In meat packaging and food processing plants, only spray when plant is not in operation. No exposed meat products, ingredients or packaging materials to be left in the room and cover food handling equipment. Any treated surface that may contact meat food products or other food products should be washed and rinsed thoroughly with potable water after spraying and before re-use for food packaging.”

    This sent my brain gallopping and I wondered: If aminopterin is illegal for use in the US, but IS legal for use in rodenticides in Canada, what would prevent Menu Foods in Canada from shipping some bottles of rodenticide they had in the supply room in their Canada storage house [presumably it has one] to Emporia, Kansas?

  17. 5CatMom says:

    Lynn,

    Great research. The link you sent WAS one I needed. Thanks for

    http://edition.cnn.com/2007/US.....index.html

    It refers to findings of aminepterin the the FOOD, as do other sites I’ve found.

    What I would like to find are articles that mention aminepterin in GLUTEN.

    When I first began searching, there were several websites with statements regarding aminepterin in gluten. Problem is, the statements aren’t attributed to any source, so I don’t know how reliable they are.

    I seem to recall finding what appeared to be a creditable looking site, but I didn’t save it. This is the one I’d like to find. This is the one I’m referring to when I talk about aminepterin in gluten. I understand that statements of fact should be sourced.

    I sent emails to some of the “aminepterin” sites, so we’ll see what comes back. Anyway, it’s interesting that others are apparently linking aminepterin and gluten.

    Also in your post (and I love this):
    “A spokesman for New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said he was not aware of any criminal investigation involving the tainted food. FBI spokesman Paul Holstein in Albany said Friday he was not aware of any FBI involvement in the case.

    “I don’t know where we’ll go from here,” he said.

    Got to tell you, I’m getting pretty sick of hearing “not aware” and “I don’t know”. What good are these people? They don’t know ANYTHING.

    Which explains why we have the current debacle.

    That’s what I ran into on Friday when I was trying to report a NATIONAL SECURITY ISSUE.

    One person wanted me to spell it.
    One person wanted to know what he should do about it.

    It was a very stressful day.

  18. 5CatMom says:

    Lynn,

    Here’s a good one. It may have been my “source”, but it’s a poor one because it’s confusing.

    “Federal testing of some of the cat and dog food and the wheat gluten used in their production turned up the chemical melamine, which can be toxic in high doses. (Check the full list of brands affected)

    Earlier, the New York State Food Laboratory identified aminopterin, a cancer drug also used as rat poison, as the likely culprit in the pet food. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it could not confirm that finding.”

    Aminopterin = Likely Culprit = Petfood

    This is confusing. I don’t understand the “culprit” comment. Wish it was specific regarding what was tested.

    http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/04/.....index.html

  19. Lynn says:

    To 5CatMom [11:38PM message]

    The way I interpretted it was culprit = aminopterin

    But that’s just my take on it.

    Univ of Guelph was one of two labs that found the aminopterin in food. I believe the other was Cornell. Cornell gave a food sample to the UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) lab that has the spectrometer; they said they couldn’t find aminopterin.

    That may be, but here are a few notes:

    • Barton Kamen and John Zebala of the UMDNJ have a special interest in aminopterin and bought the rights to the drug from UMDNJ in 2003. As I recall, they’ve been conducting aminopterin clinical trials with anticipation of marketing the drug out of Syntrix Biologic in Washington State [for immune arthritis and certain cancer treatments]. Maybe my brain’s working overtime…..but……

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....ers_o.html

    Certainly Dr.’s Kamen and Zebala must have considered that any findings of aminopterin [which they will market as AminoTrexate, if my memory serves] in pet food would cast a negative pall on the drug they plan to market.

    • Andrew von Eschenback, the Commissioner of the FDA [Sundlof’s boss], has a strong background in cancer as a physician and has close ties to cancer-related organizations. He is new to the FDA. Some believe he is more concerned with drug approvals than drug safety.
    http://www.fda.gov/oc/voneschenbach/bio.html
    http://www.time.com/time/magaz.....81,00.html

    I’m not a biochemist, but I do know that aminopterin in the body over time builds up in the liver. Liver function tests are indicators of toxicity. I don’t know if it shows up in food - I have to assume so, as two labs originally said they had found it.

    Then there’s Dr. Lijun Mao………whose credentials are far reaching.

  20. Lynn says:

    To: 5CatMom re 11:38 PM message

    Don’t know what happened – I Just wrote a length response to your posting and it never made it to the website. I will try to reconstruct.

    • I interpret culprit = aminopterin

    • Here are some other bits of info you might find interesting:

    o Two labs found aminopterin in food: Univ of Guelph and the Cornell lab.

    o Cornell gave a food sample or a pet tissue sample [????? conflicting reports] sample to the UMDNJ so they could check using their highly sophisticated spectrometer. They couldn’t find any aminopterin. Here’s the press release: http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/07.....html?.v=71

    o [Now, for a moment forget about aminopterin = rodenticide. That’s just one of its uses.] You may have heard of methotrexate, which is a kissing cousin to aminopterin. “MTX” has been legal in the US for a long time and is a very effective weapon used to fight cancer and treat autoimmune [e.g., rheumatoid] arthritis. Methotrexate remains in the body for some time; people who take MTX have frequent blood work in order to check liver functions, as MTX does take its toll on the liver as well as other body systems. There’s no reason to think that aminopterin does not cause the same effects.

    o UMDNJ owned the rights to aminopterin until 2003 when they sold them to Syntrix Biologic [whose CEO is Dr. John Zebala] in Washington State. “The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has recently awarded Syntrix Biosystems $800,000 to support the clinical testing of Aminopterin in psoriasis.”

    o Dr. Barton Kamen of the UMDNJ was involved with the clinical trial with aminopterin for leukemia in 2005. http://clincancerres.aacrjourn.....11/22/8089

    o FDA Commissioner Andrew von Eschenbach has a long history as a physician involved with cancer treatment, as well as affiliations with cancer organizations. He is new to the FDA and some have indicated that he may be more concerned with drug approvals than with drug safety.
    http://www.time.com/time/magaz.....81,00.html

    Given the close alliance between Syntrix [owner of aminopterin rights] and UMDNJ, my guess that it would be a great concern that findings of aminopterin in pet food would cast a negative pall on cancer treatment for humans. But that’s just my head rambling……

  21. Lynn says:

    SUMMARY OF AMINOPTERIN LAB TESTING REFERENCES
    [Who said it and the link]:

    I just went through all my references on aminopterin and have listed them in chronological order below. Note the contradictions. Only relevant portions of the link are shown after the date:

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....at_po.html

    2007-03-23

    A source close to the investigation tells ABC News that the rodenticide, which the source says is illegal to use in the U.S., was on wheat that was imported from China and used by Menu Foods in nearly 100 brands of dog and cat food.

    A news conference is scheduled for this afternoon by experts in Albany, New York where scientists at the state’s Food Laboratory made the discovery a week after a massive recall of 60 million cans and pouches was issued.

    The chemical is aminopterin.

    http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/A.....aseID=1598

    2007-03-23

    New York State Agriculture Commissioner Patrick Hooker and Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine Dean Donald F. Smith announced today that scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

    The Food Laboratory received the pet food samples from a toxicologist at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University, where testing has been underway to try to identify the cause of kidney failure in dogs and cats that consumed the recalled brands of pet food. At Cornell’s request, the Food Laboratory tested the samples for poisons and toxins, and identified Aminopterin in the pet food samples at a level of at least 40 parts per million.

    “We are pleased that the expertise of our New York State Food Laboratory was able to contribute to identifying the agent that caused numerous illnesses and deaths in dogs and cats across the nation,” the Commissioner said. “New Yorkers can be assured that we have two of the nation’s leading laboratory programs in food safety and animal health working on this problem.”

    The Dean of the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine Donald F. Smith concurred by saying, “The close partnership between the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University and the Department of Agriculture and Markets was key to this finding.”

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/n.....ests_n.htm

    2007-03-27

    Scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory on Friday identified aminopterin as the likely culprit in a poisoning scare that prompted the recall of 95 brands of “cuts and gravy” style dog and cat food.

    Scientists at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University and at the New York State Food Laboratory tested three cat food samples provided by the manufacturer and found aminopterin in two of them, the labs announced Friday.

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf

    2007-03-27

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….suspected cause is aminopterin….”

    http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/07.....html?.v=71

    2007-03-30

    Researchers from Syntrix Biosystems, Inc. and The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) announced today that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of animals who had died from consuming food from Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wls/sto.....id=5171430

    2007-03-30

    The melamine finding came a week after scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory identified a cancer drug and rat poison called aminopterin as the likely culprit in the pet food. But the FDA said it could not confirm that finding, nor have researchers at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey when they looked at tissue samples taken from dead cats. And experts at the University of Guelph detected aminopterin in some samples of the recalled pet food, but only in the parts per billion or trillion range.

    “Biologically, that means nothing. It wouldn’t do anything,” said Grant Maxie, a veterinary pathologist at the Canadian university. “This is a puzzle.”

    Meanwhile, New York officials stuck to their aminopterin finding and pointed out that it was unlikely that melamine could have poisoned any of the animals thought to have died after eating the contaminated pet food. Melamine is used to make plastic kitchen ware and is used as a fertilizer in Asia.

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf

    2007-03-30

    Univ. of guelph Lab Services: “We could not confirm the presence of aminopterin in the suspect food.”

    http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/A.....seID=1599.

    2007-03-30

    [Patrick Hooker]

    “Last Friday, we announced that the New York State Food Laboratory identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from Menu Foods. We stand confident in our finding of Aminopterin and know of at least one other laboratory that has confirmed its presence, the University of Guelph’s Animal Health Laboratory in Canada

    [LS: Univ of Guelph suspected it but could not confirm it.]

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....n_fin.html

    2007-03-30

    The FDA is the latest of three institutions to contradict findings that linked Menu Foods product contamination to aminopterin, and says a contaminant it has detected could also be in pet dry food.

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....ers_o.html

    2007-03-31

    Using a highly specific and sensitive test for Aminopterin, investigators at UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) documented that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of affected animals. “Aminopterin persists in the liver of animals for months at levels that are readily detected,” said Barton A. Kamen, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Pediatric Oncology at UMDNJ. “Whatever is causing the renal failure, it is not Aminopterin.”

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf

    2007-04-02

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….Given the lack of evidence that melamine or aminopterin or melamine is responsible for the renal failure……

    http://www.consumeraffairs.com.....all15.html

    2007-04-04

    But the New York Department of Agriculture and an agricultural laboratory in Canada dispute that finding. They say the pet food is contaminated with a rat poison called Aminopterin.

    The New York lab has 42 scientists and support staff and a $3.5 million annual budget. It tests about 20,000 samples of food annually. It has some of the latest high-tech equipment, some of it purchased with Homeland Security funds as a safeguard against bioterrorism.

    The director of the New York lab, Daniel Rice, told USA Today that all of pieces of the poisoning puzzle have not yet been found.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.....185542.htm

    2007-04-10

    At a press conference in Albany on March 23, researchers at the New York State Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory reported they had found a toxin called aminopterin in two out of three pet food samples provided by Menu Foods. Smith participated in that press conference because the samples of pet food tested by the Albany laboratory had been supplied by Cornell researchers during an early phase of the investigation.

    However, Smith and Stephen Sundlof, the FDA’s chief veterinarian, noted at the Washington press conference that neither Cornell nor the FDA could confirm the presence of aminopterin in samples. Aminopterin, a derivative of folic acid, is sometimes used as a rodenticide, though such use is banned in the United States and Canada.

    Note from Lynn: And you wonder why we’re confused?

  22. Lynn says:

    SUMMARY OF AMINOPTERIN LAB TESTING REFERENCES
    [Who said it and the link]:

    Thinking I had the laboratories confused in my previous post, I just went through all my references on aminopterin and have listed them in chronological order below. Note the contradictions. Only relevant portions of the link are shown after the date:

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....at_po.html
    2007-03-23

    A source close to the investigation tells ABC News that the rodenticide, which the source says is illegal to use in the U.S., was on wheat that was imported from China and used by Menu Foods in nearly 100 brands of dog and cat food.

    A news conference is scheduled for this afternoon by experts in Albany, New York where scientists at the state’s Food Laboratory made the discovery a week after a massive recall of 60 million cans and pouches was issued.

    The chemical is aminopterin.

    http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/A.....aseID=1598
    2007-03-23

    New York State Agriculture Commissioner Patrick Hooker and Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine Dean Donald F. Smith announced today that scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

    The Food Laboratory received the pet food samples from a toxicologist at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University, where testing has been underway to try to identify the cause of kidney failure in dogs and cats that consumed the recalled brands of pet food. At Cornell’s request, the Food Laboratory tested the samples for poisons and toxins, and identified Aminopterin in the pet food samples at a level of at least 40 parts per million.

    “We are pleased that the expertise of our New York State Food Laboratory was able to contribute to identifying the agent that caused numerous illnesses and deaths in dogs and cats across the nation,” the Commissioner said. “New Yorkers can be assured that we have two of the nation’s leading laboratory programs in food safety and animal health working on this problem.”

    The Dean of the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine Donald F. Smith concurred by saying, “The close partnership between the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University and the Department of Agriculture and Markets was key to this finding.”

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/n.....ests_n.htm
    2007-03-27

    Scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory on Friday identified aminopterin as the likely culprit in a poisoning scare that prompted the recall of 95 brands of “cuts and gravy” style dog and cat food.

    Scientists at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University and at the New York State Food Laboratory tested three cat food samples provided by the manufacturer and found aminopterin in two of them, the labs announced Friday.

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-03-27

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….suspected cause is aminopterin….”

    http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/07.....html?.v=71
    2007-03-30

    Researchers from Syntrix Biosystems, Inc. and The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) announced today that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of animals who had died from consuming food from Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wls/sto.....id=5171430
    2007-03-30

    The melamine finding came a week after scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory identified a cancer drug and rat poison called aminopterin as the likely culprit in the pet food. But the FDA said it could not confirm that finding, nor have researchers at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey when they looked at tissue samples taken from dead cats. And experts at the University of Guelph detected aminopterin in some samples of the recalled pet food, but only in the parts per billion or trillion range.

    “Biologically, that means nothing. It wouldn’t do anything,” said Grant Maxie, a veterinary pathologist at the Canadian university. “This is a puzzle.”

    Meanwhile, New York officials stuck to their aminopterin finding and pointed out that it was unlikely that melamine could have poisoned any of the animals thought to have died after eating the contaminated pet food. Melamine is used to make plastic kitchen ware and is used as a fertilizer in Asia.

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-03-30

    Univ. of guelph Lab Services: “We could not confirm the presence of aminopterin in the suspect food.”

    http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/A.....seID=1599.
    2007-03-30
    [Patrick Hooker]
    “Last Friday, we announced that the New York State Food Laboratory identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from Menu Foods. We stand confident in our finding of Aminopterin and know of at least one other laboratory that has confirmed its presence, the University of Guelph’s Animal Health Laboratory in Canada

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....n_fin.html
    2007-03-30

    The FDA is the latest of three institutions to contradict findings that linked Menu Foods product contamination to aminopterin, and says a contaminant it has detected could also be in pet dry food.

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....ers_o.html
    2007-03-31

    Using a highly specific and sensitive test for Aminopterin, investigators at UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) documented that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of affected animals. “Aminopterin persists in the liver of animals for months at levels that are readily detected,” said Barton A. Kamen, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Pediatric Oncology at UMDNJ. “Whatever is causing the renal failure, it is not Aminopterin.”

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-04-02

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….Given the lack of evidence that melamine or aminopterin or melamine is responsible for the renal failure……

    http://www.consumeraffairs.com.....all15.html
    2007-04-04

    But the New York Department of Agriculture and an agricultural laboratory in Canada dispute that finding. They say the pet food is contaminated with a rat poison called Aminopterin.

    The New York lab has 42 scientists and support staff and a $3.5 million annual budget. It tests about 20,000 samples of food annually. It has some of the latest high-tech equipment, some of it purchased with Homeland Security funds as a safeguard against bioterrorism.

    The director of the New York lab, Daniel Rice, told USA Today that all of pieces of the poisoning puzzle have not yet been found.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.....185542.htm
    2007-04-10

    At a press conference in Albany on March 23, researchers at the New York State Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory reported they had found a toxin called aminopterin in two out of three pet food samples provided by Menu Foods. Smith participated in that press conference because the samples of pet food tested by the Albany laboratory had been supplied by Cornell researchers during an early phase of the investigation.

    However, Smith and Stephen Sundlof, the FDA’s chief veterinarian, noted at the Washington press conference that neither Cornell nor the FDA could confirm the presence of aminopterin in samples. Aminopterin, a derivative of folic acid, is sometimes used as a rodenticide, though such use is banned in the United States

  23. Lynn says:

    SUMMARY OF AMINOPTERIN LAB TESTING REFERENCES
    [Who said it and the link]:

    Thinking I had the laboratories confused in my previous post, I just went through all my references on aminopterin and have listed them in chronological order below. Note the contradictions. Only relevant portions of the link are shown after the date:

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....at_po.html
    2007-03-23

    A source close to the investigation tells ABC News that the rodenticide, which the source says is illegal to use in the U.S., was on wheat that was imported from China and used by Menu Foods in nearly 100 brands of dog and cat food.

    A news conference is scheduled for this afternoon by experts in Albany, New York where scientists at the state’s Food Laboratory made the discovery a week after a massive recall of 60 million cans and pouches was issued.

    The chemical is aminopterin.

    http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/A.....aseID=1598
    2007-03-23

    New York State Agriculture Commissioner Patrick Hooker and Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine Dean Donald F. Smith announced today that scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

    The Food Laboratory received the pet food samples from a toxicologist at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University, where testing has been underway to try to identify the cause of kidney failure in dogs and cats that consumed the recalled brands of pet food. At Cornell’s request, the Food Laboratory tested the samples for poisons and toxins, and identified Aminopterin in the pet food samples at a level of at least 40 parts per million.

    “We are pleased that the expertise of our New York State Food Laboratory was able to contribute to identifying the agent that caused numerous illnesses and deaths in dogs and cats across the nation,” the Commissioner said. “New Yorkers can be assured that we have two of the nation’s leading laboratory programs in food safety and animal health working on this problem.”

    The Dean of the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine Donald F. Smith concurred by saying, “The close partnership between the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University and the Department of Agriculture and Markets was key to this finding.”

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/n.....ests_n.htm
    2007-03-27

    Scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory on Friday identified aminopterin as the likely culprit in a poisoning scare that prompted the recall of 95 brands of “cuts and gravy” style dog and cat food.

    Scientists at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University and at the New York State Food Laboratory tested three cat food samples provided by the manufacturer and found aminopterin in two of them, the labs announced Friday.

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-03-27

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….suspected cause is aminopterin….”

    http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/07.....html?.v=71
    2007-03-30

    Researchers from Syntrix Biosystems, Inc. and The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) announced today that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of animals who had died from consuming food from Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wls/sto.....id=5171430
    2007-03-30

    The melamine finding came a week after scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory identified a cancer drug and rat poison called aminopterin as the likely culprit in the pet food. But the FDA said it could not confirm that finding, nor have researchers at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey when they looked at tissue samples taken from dead cats. And experts at the University of Guelph detected aminopterin in some samples of the recalled pet food, but only in the parts per billion or trillion range.

    “Biologically, that means nothing. It wouldn’t do anything,” said Grant Maxie, a veterinary pathologist at the Canadian university. “This is a puzzle.”

    Meanwhile, New York officials stuck to their aminopterin finding and pointed out that it was unlikely that melamine could have poisoned any of the animals thought to have died after eating the contaminated pet food. Melamine is used to make plastic kitchen ware and is used as a fertilizer in Asia.

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-03-30

    Univ. of guelph Lab Services: “We could not confirm the presence of aminopterin in the suspect food.”

    http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/A.....seID=1599.
    2007-03-30
    [Patrick Hooker]
    “Last Friday, we announced that the New York State Food Laboratory identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from Menu Foods. We stand confident in our finding of Aminopterin and know of at least one other laboratory that has confirmed its presence, the University of Guelph’s Animal Health Laboratory in Canada

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....n_fin.html
    2007-03-30

    The FDA is the latest of three institutions to contradict findings that linked Menu Foods product contamination to aminopterin, and says a contaminant it has detected could also be in pet dry food.

  24. Lynn says:

    CONTINUATION OF ABOVE MESSAGE [I HOPE]

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....ers_o.html
    2007-03-31

    Using a highly specific and sensitive test for Aminopterin, investigators at UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) documented that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of affected animals. “Aminopterin persists in the liver of animals for months at levels that are readily detected,” said Barton A. Kamen, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Pediatric Oncology at UMDNJ. “Whatever is causing the renal failure, it is not Aminopterin.”

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-04-02

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….Given the lack of evidence that melamine or aminopterin or melamine is responsible for the renal failure……

    http://www.consumeraffairs.com.....all15.html
    2007-04-04

    But the New York Department of Agriculture and an agricultural laboratory in Canada dispute that finding. They say the pet food is contaminated with a rat poison called Aminopterin.

    The New York lab has 42 scientists and support staff and a $3.5 million annual budget. It tests about 20,000 samples of food annually. It has some of the latest high-tech equipment, some of it purchased with Homeland Security funds as a safeguard against bioterrorism.

    The director of the New York lab, Daniel Rice, told USA Today that all of pieces of the poisoning puzzle have not yet been found.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.....185542.htm
    2007-04-10

    At a press conference in Albany on March 23, researchers at the New York State Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory reported they had found a toxin called aminopterin in two out of three pet food samples provided by Menu Foods. Smith participated in that press conference because the samples of pet food tested by the Albany laboratory had been supplied by Cornell researchers during an early phase of the investigation.

    However, Smith and Stephen Sundlof, the FDA’s chief veterinarian, noted at the Washington press conference that neither Cornell nor the FDA could confirm the presence of aminopterin in samples. Aminopterin, a derivative of folic acid, is sometimes used as a rodenticide, though such use is banned in the United States and Canada.

    And you wonder why we’re confused???

  25. Lynn says:

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....ers_o.html
    2007-03-31

    Using a highly specific and sensitive test for Aminopterin, investigators at UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) documented that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of affected animals. “Aminopterin persists in the liver of animals for months at levels that are readily detected,” said Barton A. Kamen, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Pediatric Oncology at UMDNJ. “Whatever is causing the renal failure, it is not Aminopterin.”

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-04-02

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….Given the lack of evidence that melamine or aminopterin or melamine is responsible for the renal failure……

    http://www.consumeraffairs.com.....all15.html
    2007-04-04

    But the New York Department of Agriculture and an agricultural laboratory in Canada dispute that finding. They say the pet food is contaminated with a rat poison called Aminopterin.

    The New York lab has 42 scientists and support staff and a $3.5 million annual budget. It tests about 20,000 samples of food annually. It has some of the latest high-tech equipment, some of it purchased with Homeland Security funds as a safeguard against bioterrorism.

    The director of the New York lab, Daniel Rice, told USA Today that all of pieces of the poisoning puzzle have not yet been found.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.....185542.htm
    2007-04-10

    At a press conference in Albany on March 23, researchers at the New York State Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory reported they had found a toxin called aminopterin in two out of three pet food samples provided by Menu Foods. Smith participated in that press conference because the samples of pet food tested by the Albany laboratory had been supplied by Cornell researchers during an early phase of the investigation.

    However, Smith and Stephen Sundlof, the FDA’s chief veterinarian, noted at the Washington press conference that neither Cornell nor the FDA could confirm the presence of aminopterin in samples. Aminopterin, a derivative of folic acid, is sometimes used as a rodenticide, though such use is banned in the United States and Canada.

    And you wonder why we’re confused?

  26. Lynn says:

    http://poopcity.typepad.com/po.....ers_o.html
    2007-03-31

    Using a highly specific and sensitive test for Aminopterin, investigators at UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) documented that there was no evidence of Aminopterin in the tissues of affected animals. “Aminopterin persists in the liver of animals for months at levels that are readily detected,” said Barton A. Kamen, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Pediatric Oncology at UMDNJ. “Whatever is causing the renal failure, it is not Aminopterin.”

    http://www.labservices.uoguelp.....xicity.pdf
    2007-04-02

    Univ of Guelph Lab Services: “….Given the lack of evidence that melamine or aminopterin or melamine is responsible for the renal failure……

    http://www.consumeraffairs.com.....all15.html
    2007-04-04

    But the New York Department of Agriculture and an agricultural laboratory in Canada dispute that finding. They say the pet food is contaminated with a rat poison called Aminopterin.

    The New York lab has 42 scientists and support staff and a $3.5 million annual budget. It tests about 20,000 samples of food annually. It has some of the latest high-tech equipment, some of it purchased with Homeland Security funds as a safeguard against bioterrorism.

    The director of the New York lab, Daniel Rice, told USA Today that all of pieces of the poisoning puzzle have not yet been found.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.....185542.htm
    2007-04-10

    At a press conference in Albany on March 23, researchers at the New York State Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory reported they had found a toxin called aminopterin in two out of three pet food samples provided by Menu Foods. Smith participated in that press conference because the samples of pet food tested by the Albany laboratory had been supplied by Cornell researchers during an early phase of the investigation.

    However, Smith and Stephen Sundlof, the FDA’s chief veterinarian, noted at the Washington press conference that neither Cornell nor the FDA could confirm the presence of aminopterin in samples. Aminopterin, a derivative of folic acid, is sometimes used as a rodenticide, though such use is banned in the United States and Canada.

  27. Andyvphil says:

    Regarding the title of this thread, note that Syntrex denies that Aminopterin is used as a rat poison anywhere. And as to the first question, “So where did it come from?” the answer may be that it didn’t come from anywhere — it was never there. The NY State Food Lab results were not replicated by the FDA or Syntrex and Guelph’s LabNote14 denies the support that NYSFL claimed (some samples showing parts per trillion is how far from the margin of error?). And Chemnutra couldn’t detect any either? “Rat poison” was very sexy, but goes the way of cold fusion, looks like the bottom line.

  28. Andyvphil says:

    Looked at the Canadian site Lynn references–can’t find Aminopterin anywhere. She seems to be saying it validates that Aminopterin is legal for use in Canada, but unless she knows that it’s in one of the brand names listed…and Syntrex denies there are any such…then I’m not following her.

  29. 5CatMom says:

    LynnSays, Andyvphil,

    Will you guys stay on the amenopterin thing? See if you can find any current new reports, that sort of thing.

    We “know” the FOOD tested positive for amenopterin. And it came from somewhere.

    The FDA is TOO TOO quiet about this thing. I find it incredulous that they STILL don’t know WHAT in the food is killing pets.

    FYI, I sent (yet another) email to FDA last night. Wish those guys would get back to me.

  30. Martha says:

    I agree with Lynn. There is something smelly in this litterbox, and even tho the federal and corporate spokespersons keep adding/rearranging litter (”covering it up”) it still stinks!

  31. Martha says:

    Oops…5CatMom is who I am agreeing with. She was just quoting Lynn at the start of her post.

  32. Angela Flynn says:

    I sent an email to the Cornell lab asking if they were looking into the possible genetic engineering link. I received a reply that they do not have to ability to do so. They have not updated their news release from 3/30 where they claim to be investigating the aminopterin finding. What I find interesting from the above posts is that the denial of aminopterin presence is in regards to not finding it in the tissue of pets that died from the food, not a denial of its presence in the wheat gluten. The Cornell lab specifically states the aminopterin was found in food samples.

    University of Guelph’s site says

    http://www.labservices.uoguelph.ca/urgent.cfm

    “While originally aminopterin, and now melamine, have been postulated as the toxin, a causative link between these toxins and acute renal failure has not been confirmed. Given the lack of proof that either aminopterin or melamine is responsible for the renal failure problems, and given our continuing investigation efforts, we will not be accepting samples for testing at this time, and we are not aware of any other lab that is offering these tests.”

    The labnotes at Guelph assert the finding of melamine in food samples.

    Out of all of the cross speaking I think the only honest words are that aminopterin and melamine are not the cause of the renal failure.

  33. 5CatMom says:

    Angela,

    Good post. Well, we just need to keep working all the angles.

    I’ve been emailing with:

    Maj Gen (Ret) Greg Gardner
    Supervisory Protective Security Advisor
    Midwest Area (ND,SD,NE,IA,KS,MO,OK,AR)
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security

    The subject is: How the pet food recall revealed national security issues, and broken departments of EPA, FDA and Homeland Security.

    Greg is nice and tried to be helpful. But he wasn’t able to help and said it’s an FDA problem. However, he is not able to give me a contact at FDA.

    Well, I already spent all day Friday TRYING to find someone at FDA (at both the state and local levels) and the FDA sent me to Greg.

    So I’ve come full circle and am now back to the starting point.

    If any FDA folks are blogging tonight, maybe they can help.

    All ideas would be appreciated at this point.

  34. 5CatMom says:

    Martha and Angela,

    Hopefully, the by-products will hit the fan soon. Will try to think of something overnight.

    This is a huge issue. Too bad our pets have paid the price for gross mismangement by the Federal Government.

  35. Ann says:

    Did anyone look at the Media Clips on ChemNutra’s website? They’ve got the one about Weins selling his stock.

    Shucks, I emailed their spin doctor and told them that in all fairness they should post this media clip:
    Phantoms at large in the poisoned pet food tragedy:

    http://www.canadafreepress.com.....040907.htm

    or, how about this one:

    Clues to pet food recall traced to Chinese City

    http://www.iht.com/articles/20.....php?page=1

    After all, folks are looking for facts..

  36. Lynn says:

    Everyone:

    Sorry about my duplicate postings in this thread. Something wasn’t uploading correctly last night.

    Andyvphil [re April 15th, 2007 at 8:28 am]: Yes, I saw Univ of Guelph’s lab notes about aminopterin being “suspect,” but not confirmed.

    I am not a lab scientist, so I don’t know what the real scientific definitions are of “suspect” and “confirm.” No, I’m not being dumb. I imagine “suspect” means what they are going to be searching for, what they are tyring to rule out or rule in. I imagine “confirm” means that they ruled in the “suspected” chemical.

    What I am thinking [just thinking, mind you] is that Univ of Guelph originally had some samples [let’s call this “sample group A” in which they found aminopterin.

    Then, some time later, they were sent sample group B [totally different] from the NY lab, an entirely different source, who had already analyzed this sample group B and found aminopterin. NY lab wanted UoG to verify their findings. So this gets recorded in the UoG labnotes as “suspect.” [Again, just wondering.] When UoG could not find aminopterin in sample group B, UoG stated they could not confirm sample B [for aminopterin]. It doesn’t mean it wasn’t there when the NY lab studied the same sample. It just means that it wasn’t there when UoG examined it.

    Ideally you want to repeat a study in order to claim it’s a valid outcome. But they were never able to do that, it appears. That still doesn’t mean that it wasn’t there for the original testing of each sample group.

    Again - just my take on it.

  37. Lynn says:

    Considering the patents that Dr. Lijun Mao holds, some involving the use of chemicals to control respiratory functions of plants, is it possible for him to control the chemical activity of the aminopterin? Works today, doesn’t tomorrow?
    I just have a real hunch about aminopterin.

    Take a look at some of the papers he-co-authored. [I’m not sure that he’s the same Lijun Mao whose name is on the last paper, though.]

    1996 Evaluation of Molecular Orientation in a Polymeric Monolayer at the
    Air-Water Interface by Polarization-Modulated Infrared Spectroscopy
    1999 Wood Adhesive from Crosslinked Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) and Partially Gelatinized Starch: Preparation and Properties
    1999 Preparation of cellulose derivatives containing carbazole chromophore
    2000 Langmuir-Blodgett films of cellulose ethers containing carbazole
    2000 Extruded Cornstarch-Glycerol-Polyvinyl Alcohol Blends: Mechanical Properties, Morphology, and Biodegradability
    2001 Environmentally friendly wood adhesive from a renewable plant polymer: characteristics and optimization
    2001 Composite Films Based on Biorelated Agro-Industrial Waste and Poly(vinyl alcohol). Preparation and Mechanical Properties Characterization
    2006 Smad3 mediates TGF-ß1-induced collagen gel contraction by human lung fibroblasts


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