Concern Over Pet Safety Causes Sales Growth For Natural Pet Products Market

cain-able.jpgConsumer concern over pet food safety, stemming from continuing pet food recalls, combined with an already high consumer interest in natural and organic products, will propel the market for natural pet products from $1.3 billion in 2007 to $2.5 billion by 2012, according to Natural, Organic and Eco-Friendly Pet Products in the U.S., a new report from Packaged Facts.

The report shows tracked sales of natural pet food through supermarkets, drugstores, and mass merchandisers surging in 2006, rising more than 200% to reach $29 million. Sales exploded during the first two quarters of 2007, however, nearly tripling to $82 million and further showing the impact of changing consumer perceptions in the wake of the recalls.

“The impact of the pet food recall may be felt for years to come, as consumers make product safety a top concern and marketers respond by placing appeals like product safety, reliability, and quality at the forefront,” notes Don Montuori, Vice President of Publishing. “Although pet specialty outlets are still the primary venue for natural and organic products, these products are rapidly infiltrating mass-market outlets, where growing demand represents big opportunities for natural and organic marketers.”

Packaged Facts expects to see full-year 2007 tracked sales of natural pet food at approximately $180 million, more than a 500% jump over 2006 sales. Yet the surge in natural sales isn’t limited to pet food alone. Accounting for approximately one-fifth of 2007 sales, natural pet care products registered a 19% Compound Annual Growth Rate from 2003 to 2007, and are forecast to turn in a 10% CAGR from 2007 to 2012, bringing sales to $458 million.

A recent Newsweek article entitled “How to Cut Your Carbon Paw Print” highlights some of the products being marketed to pet parents. Among them are biodegradable waste containers, environmentally friendly cat litter, dog and cat toys made from earth-friendly products and all-natural pet shampoos and sprays.

6 Responses to “Concern Over Pet Safety Causes Sales Growth For Natural Pet Products Market”

  1. nora says:

    Now, after Home Cooking for my pets I myself have turned into a doting pet parent who REFUSES to buy ANYTHING that is not Natural (shampoos and other products besides food included) and if no alternatives can be found I improvise by using Human Grade products from my Health Food Store that are made in USA only. I am very happy to see that I am not alone Nationwide in my quest for safe and healthy products for my precious fur babies. The only companies that will get my hard earned money are the ones who are truly concerned about my pets welfare. And I lavish them with the care products it takes to keep them healthy and beautiful and happy!!!

  2. Janine says:

    I hear you, Nora! All of us who have pets that were victims should be operating this way, too. I know I am. It has been so wonderful to see my precious cats regaining strength, health, and vitality simply by paying more and closer attention to what goes in (and on) their bodies. I am currently replacing all of our household rugs with all natural, organic, hand made wool rugs, and will soon be looking into a whole house air filtration system. It feels good to be in control of things again and see how it makes a difference for myself and my beloved animals.

  3. Chris says:

    Actually, Cain and Able’s Conditioners contain methylparaben., which the Environmental Working Group lists as a moderate hazard to people and pets. http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.c.....paraben%26

    Checkout everything you have in the house at their comprehensive database @ ewg.org.

    Just because it says “natural” on it, do not take it at face value!

    Good luck!

  4. kaefamily says:

    Agree with Chris.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Chris, good advice. Something else to be aware of is that the EWG does not distinguish between products that do or do not contain nano ingredients on their lists. AFAIK, anyway.

  6. nora says:

    Yes. Inspecting the ingrediants and having a bit of chemistry knowlege is also helpful by knowing what to avoid and look for! That goes along with being educated and informed.


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