Del Monte Confirms Wheat Gluten Was Sold As Human Grade

XZAY Wheat GlutenDel Monte, who recently recalled more than a dozen varieties of pet food, just confirmed that the tainted wheat gluten was sold to them as fit for human consumption:

Del Monte Foods has confirmed that the melamine-tainted wheat gluten used in several of its recalled pet food products was supplied as a “food grade” additive, raising the likelihood that contaminated wheat gluten might have entered the human food supply.

“Yes, it is food grade,” Del Monte spokesperson Melissa Murphy-Brown wrote in reply to an e-mail query.

Wheat gluten is sold in both “food grade” and “feed grade” varieties. Either may be used in pet food, but only “food grade” gluten may be used in the manufacture of products meant for human consumption.

So why won’t the FDA disclose the named of the US broker who sold the toxic wheat gluten?

Several media organizations are investigating the likelihood that the toxic wheat gluten has made into the human food supply.

Washington Post: Sundlof said the FDA is not aware that any of the contaminated gluten went into human food but said he could not confirm this “with 100 percent certainty.”

USA Today: Wheat gluten is also used in some human foods and is an important component of flour, allowing bread to rise. The contaminated batch of wheat gluten is not believed to have been used in any foods for humans.

17 Responses to “Del Monte Confirms Wheat Gluten Was Sold As Human Grade”

  1. Jonathan says:

    Our mainstream media blows.. I am really disappointed even more than I was before this.

    Time to stay away from processed/frozen foods.

  2. Jonathan says:

    Makes sense why no one will disclose the US supplier…

    The puzzle is starting to fall into place.

  3. Denise says:

    What about zinc oxide? It can be toxic- and if it’s micronized?

    Do these companies use the same supplier as far as other common ingredients?

  4. Jonathan says:

    Who knows. The best thing I can do is just use a product I can trust. I feel lucky I found one this weekend, it wasn’t easy.

  5. Denise says:

    It’s all scary and heartbreaking for sure.

    It’s the possibility of one or more contaminants coming from the same supplier, or an interaction of ingredients, that brought up the question. If the overeseas supplier is the source it would seem prudent to investigate all of their products for safety, alone and in common combination.

  6. keenisar says:

    Brace yourself, for another Weekend Update!

    It is already apparent the ‘melamine’ may just be a traceable element within the original shipment and thus it is found in all animals effected but not necessarily the cause.

    The big processing corporations wouldn’t mix shipment -same- ingredients together would they?

    Although they deny any link to the recall, the term ‘US suppliers’ keeps popping up.
    Most folks, like me, assume that US giants in the Ag businesses ‘Produce’.

    Their websites, however, boast that they engage in procurement and transportation.

    The Financial pages state that procurement and transportation is a fundamental reason for their growth potential.

    It is so reassuring to know:
    A. that within our global economy and free-trade, the US biggies have multiple production facilities abroad;
    B. the mystery shipment was vital(human grade) wheat gluten so necessary in the production of flour and bakery goods! Or
    C. that it got mixed together, after procurement and was transported.

  7. G.K. says:

    Supposedly, Xuzhou Anying now claims that they supplied the gluten (which they didn’t produce, but rather purchased from other local suppliers) to another company, Suzhou Textile Import and Export Co.. (which a search reveals is now known as “Suzhou Hengrun Import & Export Corp., Ltd.”.

    http://www.iht.com/articles/ap.....Recall.php

    From one of Suzhou’s online listings:

    http://www.made-in-china.com/showroom/clive130

    “We mainly handles the import and export of piece goods, garments, woolen/cotton knitwear and hometextile, etc., as well as the foreign trade of light-industry products, arts and crafts, chemicals, machanical, and medical products.”

    I’m wondering which “chemicals” and “medical products” they’re working with. Is Xuzhou just trying to pass the blame, or could this company have actually been the one we purchased the gluten from? And, if so, why on earth were these companies purchasing foodstuffs from a foreign textile company?

  8. G.K. says:

    Or, rather.. why was whichever major American supplier bought and sold the gluten purchasing and distributing foodstuffs from a foreign textile company?

    (If this is indeed the case.)

  9. 4lgdfriend says:

    In light of the other products supplied by the identified Chinese source I keep asking why they are not extending the investigation to other grain glutens and other grains that may also have been contaminated. The other reason for doing this is the reports of ARF/illness in pets that ate dry food (for example Nutro) which contained no wheat gluten, but DID contain corn gluten meal and wheat.

  10. E B says:

    “Human grade” = found currently in foods bought and consumed by humans? How is everybody feeling? Is genetic alteration of the wheat suspected? Why are huge food processing businesses williing to risk adding ingredients from places where even our lame and buyable FDA has no authority? Are we still selling “surplus” wheat to Russia? What’s wrong with using some of our (presumed) safe American or Canadian grains in our own foods as well as our pets’ foods?

  11. Sean says:

    There’s just TOO much secrecy, ambiguity and apparently, foot-dragging regarding this very concerning story. Who knows how many human and animal lives are still being put at risk, yet no one seems willing to step up to the plate and demand answers and accountability. And the FDA is just as responsible as anyone for those pet deaths, as they have done little more than provide the bare minimum of facts to the public while proceeding in the slowest possible mode of action. When you have an Administration that cares more about protecting corporate interests than the lives of people and their pets, this is what happens and will continue to happen.

  12. Itchmo » Blog Archive » Chinese Manufacturer Says Gluten Bought From Another Source says:

    […] Anying Biologic Technology Development Company, named by the FDA as the source of the human-grade tainted wheat gluten, says that they bought the supplies from someone else — leading to speculation that even more […]

  13. 4lgdfriend says:

    howl911.com: “Nestle invested 80 million yuan (10.26 million U.S. dollars) in the plant and it has an annual production ability of 20,000 tons. It is the company’s first pet food plant in China.
    The plant will use local-purchased raw materials including bean, corn and wheat. Its products will be sold in supermarkets, pet clinics and pet shops. ”

    In light of the other products supplied by the identified Chinese source I keep asking why they are not extending the investigation to other grain glutens and other grains that may also have been contaminated. The other reason for doing this is the reports of ARF/illness in pets that ate dry food (for example Nutro) which contained no wheat gluten, but DID contain corn gluten meal and wheat.

  14. filbert says:

    The USA Today quote, “Wheat gluten is also used in some human foods and is an important component of flour, allowing bread to rise,” is misleading. Wheat gluten is a protein that is present in certain types of flour, so yes it is a component of flour, but it is not usually added in. Gluten does not allow bread to rise; that is a result of leavening, whether it be yeast or another source of gas such as baking powder or baking soda.

    What gluten does is provide an elastic mesh of protein that makes flour based goods springy or chewy. Bread flour has a higher level of gluten since breads need more structure to maintain it’s rise, whereas all purpose flour has a mid level of gluten, good for more tender items such as cakes and muffins, while pastry flours have low levels of gluten so they make crispy and flaky goods instead of chewy. What determines the gluten content of flour is the types of grains used.

  15. PBurns says:

    For the uneasy relationship between pet food, PETA and wheat gluten, see >> http://terriermandotcom.blogsp.....luten.html

    P

  16. Sean says:

    Update: by process of elimination, ARCHER-DANIELS-MIDLAND is likely the U.S. supplier!

    http://www.democraticundergrou.....215;560863

  17. Lisa Clay says:

    I went onto the Del Monte site yesterday since I know they make people food. Turns out, the College Inn broth (mostly the chicken varieties) that they sell uses Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten - I have no idea whether “Hydrolyzed” makes it any better, but I have my doubts. I searched through the ingredients of many of their other products and only found this in the broth. Needless to say, I will never buy another product without seeing if it contains wheat gluten.


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