Lab Reports Acetaminophen In Eagle Pack Senior Dog Food

ExpertoxExpertox, a Texas lab, tested an unopened, original package of Eagle Pack Holistic Select Senior Care Formula for Senior Dogs. The lab reported that the sample of dog food tested positive for acetaminophen.

The sealed bag of Eagle Pack Holistic Select Senior Care Formula for Senior Dogs had the best if fed by date of: 0549 P2 10 JUL 08.

A pet owner and a small pet store owner sent the bag of Eagle Pack dog food to Expertox after her dogs experienced symptoms when eating Eagle Pack, and she also received complaints from customers using Eagle Pack. Symptoms from both her dogs and customers’ dogs included vomiting, diarrhea, itching, eyes swelling, hives, conjunctivitis, tremors, and some unexplained aggression.

She then contacted Eagle Pack and said they told her that problems with Eagle Pack were only coming from her store. They said the itching was probably caused by the dogs going into the ocean and not getting the salt/sand out of their coats or that people were not rinsing their dogs completely after a bath.

Eagle Pack came by her store to obtain samples in mid-August, and she said she has still not received test results from them. She then contacted the FDA, and an agent come by three times to obtain samples and unopened bags of dog food. She said she hasn’t hear anything back from the FDA either.

Getting tired of waiting for answers, the pet owner sent a bag to Expertox. She sent them an unopened bag with the same date code of the bag that her dogs were eating from. After receiving the test result, she forwarded the document to Eagle Pack.

She said when she switched her dogs off of Eagle Pack, they got better and the symptoms subsided. She also said that she has had complaints from customers on every formula of Eagle Pack, including cat food. She mentioned that she did this testing for the safety and well-being of pets and has nothing against Eagle Pack.

Itchmo spoke to an Eagle Pack spokesman today. The company was aware of Expertox’s results. The spokesman first said that Expertox has been completely discredited by the FDA. He stated that the FDA has not been able to find acetaminophen in any of the samples that Expertox has tested and get any of the same test results that Expertox has been reporting.

Also, he mentioned that after they found out about the positive test results, they tested samples of their food in their independent labs and they all tested negative for acetaminophen. In addition, he stated that the amount of acetaminophen that Expertox found would have to be 3600 times more to cause symptoms in pets. He added that the company has not received any other complaints about their food.

UPDATE: Eagle Pack posted a response on their website to Itchmo’s post about Expertox’s findings:

There is a report circulating on the Internet that one bag of Holistic Select Senior Care dog food tested positive for trace amounts of Acetaminophen. ExperTox laboratories performed the test. This is the same lab that claimed to have found Acetaminophen in 5 other brands of dry premium and holistic brands. Yet in their own testing of these brands, the FDA and 2 leading Universities could not detect Acetaminophen in these foods and could not verify results claimed by ExperTox. It appears their findings cannot be considered valid or reliable.

Members of our Breeder Advisory Council have not reported any ill effects of their pets. This writer has 8 champion Brittanys of varying ages and has not experienced any issues. Two recent litters of 7 and 11 puppies are all in good health.

As noted in the Internet report, FDA took samples of our food in August 2007. There have been no adverse reports received from the FDA and our foods have not been recalled and remain safe.

We have our own in-house test lab that conducts ongoing tests on incoming ingredients and finished food. When major issues like the March 2007 melamine recall occurred, and now the Acetaminophen issue, we use independent labs for testing. Our foods have always tested negative and were never part of the recall.

(Thanks Eric)

100 Responses to “Lab Reports Acetaminophen In Eagle Pack Senior Dog Food”

Pages: « 1 [2] Show All

  1. K Tremell says:

    Someone should question the person who got this food tested. Didn’t Expertox find acetaminophen in Canidae and Innova, she is still selling these foods, what’s the beef with Eagle???

  2. Lesliek says:

    Chris- Acetaminophen is never used for cats, but is sometimes used under vet supervision for dogs with chronic conditions who can’t tolerate other anti-inflamatories or painkillers.

  3. MaineMom says:

    Thanks once again Menusux and Anonymous! Busy day - just caught up on these new issues. My guess is that if the whole truth ever hit the mass media there would be a nation wide panic. Best bet, plant a “victory garden”, buy local and USA organic, and try to stay on top of what’s happening every day. Survival of the fittest! It’s a real jungle out there.

  4. Louie says:

    What we need is a dip stick tester for acetaminophen.
    Has anyone ever heard of such a thing?

  5. Don Earl says:

    It’s kind of interesting how the PFI straight party line keeps going back to, “ExperTox is the only one finding it.”.

    That’s not true. Our sick, dead or dying pets found it also.

  6. Carol says:

    When the FDA and the PFI tells us WHY the results at Expertox regarding acetaminophen are inaccurate, then I will not continue to lose faith more every day. I would like to think that once my food tested positive for melamine and acetaminophen, the first thing they would do is want more of the same that I have—only “flavors” that I had more than one of (with the same use by date)were sent for testing. I am tired of all the negative test results put out by the FDA and PFI because I want the same food that tested positive by Expertox tested by them—why would they not want to? I have my opinions –I only hope I am wrong. Not only is the poisonings of our beloved pets an outrage, so is the handling of this debacle by the FDA and PF Co’s that continue to dismiss us. I will keep the food in my freezer for as long as I need and I will remain vocal for a very long time. I am so tired of this. I look forward to the release of MenuFoods’ “retesting” that they said would be done as soon as possible on October 19—-.

  7. Carol says:

    MaineMom says:

    November 7th, 2007 at 10:55 pm

    I am doing my best to get the story to the mass media!!! Lisa McCormick at consumeraffairs.com has been covering this and today I am taping for the SteveDale Radio Show—anything to keep this in the spotlight!!!!!

  8. Sharon says:

    Neither the manufacturer nor the FDA ever got back to her. Big surprise. Yesterday we heard more lies of caring coming out of the mouth of George Bush. I hope they all rot in hell.

  9. Ann H says:

    [menusux says:

    November 7th, 2007 at 7:39 pm
    Ann H says:

    November 7th, 2007 at 7:03 pm

    “Are any of the pet food brands that tested positive for acetaminophen sold outside of the US?”

    What’s been tested which were factory sealed when they went to ExperTox were 3 Special Kitty pouches in 3 different flavors and now the Eagle Pack Senior Dry Dog Food. Both Eagle Pack and Menu Foods distribute both brands outside of the US:

    http://www.eaglepack.com/Pages….._dist.html

    Eagle Pack International Distributors List

    http://www.menufoods.com/recal…..043007.htm

    Menu Foods Special Kitty Canada Recall List.

    My thoughts are that we find pet owners using these brands outside of the US and get them tested.

    Right now, with some unopened testing positive that eliminates most of the innuendoes of unclean hands. Having testing done outside of the US might help with the mud they’re throwing at Expertox. One spinning hurdle used by the PFCs and FDA is mostly over, now the 2nd hurdle is the lab.

    I know that my state Agriculture dept was to do acetaminophen testing, but in June the FDA told them it wasn’t there and they did NOT test for it.

    We have some inside the US problems that we need to work around too.

    Finding those products outside the US and getting tested, even to EU standards, can only help solve the BS being thrown at us.

  10. Carol says:

    There should be penalties (not just financial) in place when the pet food companies and the FDA fail to respond and FollowUp on complaints like these. At this point there is no consequence for the pf co’s to just stop communication–like with the results back to this pet store owner. Until regulations change I think this will continue!

    Another troubling problem is where else is this news getting out now—if it were not for this site I would not know about this finding. Think how many more people may be having trouble with their foods and not know what we are slowly finding out!!

  11. pat says:

    i’m really weary of this controversy over results coming from expertox and i’m wondering if there might be a way to put this to rest once and for all. i’d like to see the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation or a similar organization do a blind test in which they send samples to expertox, fda and uc/davis. in this test, they would have “clean” samples, and some they themselves adulterated with acetaminophen and/or other contaminants. the labs would not know where the samples came from… that is, they would not know that it was actually an evaluation of their competence. only a2la would know who got which samples. i think the results of a test like that might prove to be very interesting.

  12. catmom5 says:

    Wonder if that’s why NONE of my cats would even touch the Eagle Pack when I tried it a few weeks ago. Thought it was strange that not one of them would eat it, but since we’ve tried other foods without success I just returned it to the store. HMMM. . .
    This would also explain why my CJ went into ARF and then developed liver disease after being poisoned last November. Never could figure out where the liver disease came from. Isn’t that typical with acetometaphine?
    Just thinking out loud here.

  13. Becky says:

    I still can’t get past that Expertox is the only place getting results.

    So has any food been tested there that hasn’t come back positive? Because it seems like they find something in just about everything sent there….

  14. Anonymous says:

    Becky, it’s also important to remember that most, if not all, of the people who sent food in for testing have had pets die or become sick, and acetaminophen is what has been found.

    The sick or dead pets is what prompted the testing to begin with. To my knowledge, Expertox is the ONLY INDEPENDENT LAB that does testing for private citizens. Otherlabs may do only government testing or testing for businesses. Many universities accept huge grants/funding from corporations that may present a conflict of interest - for example: University of California at Davis received around a half million dollars from Hill’s. I believe it was UC Davis that told Don Earl BEFORE HE SENT IN CAT FOOD SAMPLES that there was no acetaminophen in the food.

    BTW, where in the process is this??? Remember the professor and student who developed a test/machine to quickly (a couple of minutes) scan for all toxins? The student brought pet food in for testing? I thought there was supposed to be a huge unveiling of the machine and work done on it last month???

    Purringfur

  15. 5CatMom says:

    Expertox is a certified lab that is not funded by PF companies, so I believe their findings.

    The fact that pet owners complained about the food, and THEN the food tested positive for acetaminophen is SIGNIFICANT.

    On the other hand, the FDA, other labs that are funded by PF companies, and labs that are less sensitive than Expertox have lots of reasons to NOT find toxins.

    If the FDA, or anyone else, can offer a technical explanation of why Expertox’s findings should be discredited, I’m a reasonable person who is willing to listen.

    But rather than get involved and try to troubleshoot the problem (of different findings), the FDA has chosen to offer no reasonable explanation, and to ignore the problem.

    I have written several letters to the FDA (another one last night), have made many phone calls, and have heard only criticism of Expertox.

    Having a criticism is fine, but refusing to explain the basis of such criticism is not.

    At some point, it may be appropriate to question Expertox, but first we need to ask “why won’t the FDA explain the difference in findings?”

    We should never, ever forget that the PET FOOD RECALL OF 2007 occurred in the USA. Why?

    IMHO, the root cause of the PF recall also explains the difference in findings.

    The root cause is very simple: POLITICS

  16. shibadiva says:

    University of Guelph (Ontario) was doing some testing early on. Perhaps they are a non-US option.

  17. furmom says:

    Perhaps somehow an independent “oversee-er” not connected with Expertox and not connected with the FDA could be present when some of these suspected foods are tested. It would be hard to argue that results were mistaken or fixed with that type of verification. I don’t trust tests that are done (or are not being done) by the FDA when probably all their employees are under a gag order anyway, and they are in the pocket of the food producers. And without an independent monitor the manufacturer or the FDA can claim Expertox is coming up with inaccurate results.

  18. Nicky says:

    It really bugs me that K Tremell would say things that that about the Innova. Natura has done so much to make sure that their products have only the best ingredients and are completly safe. Just because one person says that her dog got sick from the food does not make it true. Also, Natura sent samples of the food to three different labs (not including their own) to be tested. None of the labs found anything wrong with the food.

  19. Anonymous says:

    Here it is…

    Professor O. David Sparkman and graduate student Teresa Vail used a mass spectrometer with the D.A.R.T. (Direct Analysis in Real Time) interface device…

    [skip]

    “The significance of the D.A.R.T. mass spectral technique is that results are available in minutes or seconds,” Sparkman said. “Because of enhancements we have made to the D.A.R.T. technology, our answers are definitely unambiguous.”

    Thank you to the University of the Pacific - April 23, 2007 Press Release
    http://web.pacific.edu/x7982.xml

    Purringfur

  20. Sandi K says:

    I have a new kitten that has been on California Natural and has had diahrrea the whole time. I dont know if the CA Natural is to blame or not but I just took her off all of it on Tuesday and she hasnt had diarrhea since. I was thinking it was from the flaxseed in that food but now I dont know what to believe. I have one unopened bag left bought at exactly the same time as the first bag…..hmmm, Im wondering if testing is needed……

  21. Don Earl says:

    Becky,

    RE: “I still can’t get past that Expertox is the only place getting results.
    So has any food been tested there that hasn’t come back positive? Because it seems like they find something in just about everything sent there….”

    ExperTox has tested hundreds of pet food samples. The numbers available early on suggest they were finding acetaminophen in approximately 5% of those samples.

    I know of only 2 other labs that even pretend to offer testing for acetaminophen in pet food and both of them are deep in the hip pockets of pet food companies. It’s also worth noting that there’s a strong likelihood of false negatives, even from ExperTox. It’s also worth noting that the only reason this information is in the public domain at all is because of private parties releasing the results.

    Pet food companies with samples known to have tested positive for acetaminophen aren’t talking about it, and there is at least one of those we know about.

    There is a huge difference between “none detected” and “none present”. No one is using a protocol able to positively eliminate the possibility of false negatives.

    Samples of Pet Pride I sent to ExperTox in unopened cans were some of the earliest to test positive for acetaminophen back in May. I had three cats when I bought that food. Two of them refused to eat it. The one that ate it died. She was a happy, healthy cat when she dug into the first can. By day 4 she started slowing down. By day 7 she was in acute renal failure and died 3 days later.

    If you have pets, especially cats, you should be VERY concerned. It has been almost a year since acetaminophen started showing up in pet food, no one knows how it got there, and it is still showing up in pet food being produced even as we speak.

    If you’re willing to believe the ExperTox results are bogus, the first question you should ask is why aren’t any of these billion dollar pet food companies suing them for libel. There are two very obvious reasons to that question, 1. Truth is an absolute defense against libel, and 2. The pet food companies don’t want to draw attention to the fact their pet food contains deadly toxins by filing a suit they can’t possibly win.

  22. joycebell says:

    Hi Trudy: I’m in the same boat you are! I too recently switched my cats to Eagle Pack cat food (since Sept.) though haven’t noticed any problems except my one cat threw up once in awhile (maybe once every 3 weeks) but I thought that’s because she’s has hairballs. My other cat’s coat has turned extremely soft now whereas it always used to be rough before (using Royal Canin Indoor 27).

    Now I’m not sure what to do–I have about 1/2 bag left of the Eagle Pack multi-cat plus just bought a brand new bag of it.

    I think I’ll return the unopened Eagle Pack and get the Orijen which is available in Milwaukee at Bark’n'Scratch Outpost.

  23. Trudy Jackson says:

    Why doesn’t expertox sue the PFI for saying things about it that aren’t true? Can’t they do that?
    Like Eagle Pack has on their site now? Isn’t that liable?

  24. carolo says:

    Thanks to the person who sent the Eagle Pack bag of dog food into Expertox for testing and shared the results. Fortunately, it isn’t something we feed. It IS, however, indicative of the fact that problems still remain in one or more of the ingredients in commercial pet food. I doubt it is confined just to pet food and would hazzard a guess if we tested cereals, for instance, we would find things we didn’t know we were consuming ourselves.

    I eat as little prepared, prepackaged food as possible and since the recall hit and I began to understand how the supply chain worked (or more accurately does NOT work) I stopped taking most supplements. When current vitamin/mineral supplements in our home run out, they will not be replaced. I wonder about the two generic prescription drugs I take, but alas they are necessary, so for now I’m resigned to taking them with the hope that the unknowns are probably small enough not to cause more harm than doing without would.

    It’s a sad time indeed when our great nation puts the health of our economy ahead of the health of it’s people. Our four footed family members are a bit like the canary in the mine.

    Again, I’d like to thank the person who sent this bag of dry food into ExperTox, paid for testing and shared results. I wonder if the list of “safe” foods wouldn’t be shorter than a list of brands and varieties that actually have caused problems.

  25. Trudy Jackson says:

    And what are the signs of slow kidney failure? My cats have been eating Eagle Pack and I really need to know what to look for.thanks,
    I asked My vet this morning what the signs of slow asetaminophen poisening would be? He didn’t know but said He’d look it up? Does anyone know?
    thanks,

  26. joycebell says:

    Trudy: see this website for an article posted last summer about symptoms:

    http://www.dogchannel.com/dog-.....-food.aspx

    Joyce

  27. Anonymous says:

    Is there any poison that brand MIC won’t sneak in?? Doesn’t sound like an accident to me anymore: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asi.....083158.stm
    Millions of Chinese-made toys have been recalled in the US and Australia after they were found to contain a substance linked to the date-rape drug GHB. .A total of five children were taken to hospital after swallowing tiny beads known as Bindeez in Australia and Aqua Dots in the US.
    The beads were coated in chemicals which transformed into the banned drug when swallowed. …In the US, two children were affected, the Consumer Product Safety Commission warned. They slipped into comas, but later recovered. ….About 4.2 million units of the toy will be recalled in the US, …The firm said Bindeez beads would in future be covered with a “foul-tasting ingredient” to try to ensure children would not eat them.

  28. Anonymous says:

    BRAND MIC: what’s the harm in adding a little acetametophin to their “vitamins”? I mean, it’s not like it’s the date-rape-drug GHB or anything. Those picky American parents and petowners. Where do they get off thinking toys and foods should not be dosed with poison? So their little children and their precious little dogs and cats croak, so what? Besides, we know that their regulatory agencies are shams and don’t forget, we own their country anyhow.

    BOYCOTT NOW

  29. Guthrie says:

    In the Congressional hearing a few weeks ago: “Diminished Capacity: Can the FDA Assure the Safety and Security of Our Nation’s Food Supply?” (http://energycommerce.house.gov/cmte_mtgs/110-oi-hrg.101107.FDAPart3.shtml), David Nelson, senior investigator, said he turned up evidence that the food companies use private, uncertified labs to test their products. (The FDA does not require that these labs meet any kind of certification.) When they get results showing contaminants, they request that the lab throw away the results without reporting them. It takes only Google and a little time to find that many pet food companies have built multi-million dollar labs for the universities they prefer to use. It sounds like ExperTox is the type of lab the FDA should be requiring. A third-party, independent, certified lab.

  30. Trudy Jackson says:

    Anonymous, I really don’t think the Aqua dots was a mistake. they ]China] just about admitted that the drug was on,in the glue that goes with the beads. Like it was no big deal.
    they will kill our pets and our children if something isn’t done Quickly. And to them- no big deal.

  31. Concha Castaneda says:

    All the perverts are probably out there buying up all the Aqua Dots before they are gone. Better than candy. Thanks China

  32. Dennis says:

    Eagle Pack responds on its website:
    http://www.eaglepack.com/Pages/EP_itchmo.html

  33. menusux says:

    http://www.eaglepack.com/Pages/EP_itchmo.html

    “Yet in their own testing of these brands, the FDA and 2 leading Universities could not detect Acetaminophen in these foods and could not verify results claimed by ExperTox. It appears their findings cannot be considered valid or reliable.

    “As noted in the Internet report, FDA took samples of our food in August 2007. There have been no adverse reports received from the FDA and our foods have not been recalled and remain safe.

    “We have our own in-house test lab that conducts ongoing tests on incoming ingredients and finished food. When major issues like the March 2007 melamine recall occurred, and now the Acetaminophen issue, we use independent labs for testing. Our foods have always tested negative and were never part of the recall.

    FDA couldn’t find the melamine here, but one of WalMart’s 17 tests did:

    http://www.reuters.com/article.....8220070822

    Reuters August 22, 2007

    Wal-Mart Says Removed Tainted Dog Treats

    “Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said it pulled two Chinese-made dog treats from its shelves nearly a month ago, and tests now show they had traces of melamine, a chemical found in pet food that was blamed for the deaths of pets and led to a massive recall earlier this year.

    “The two types of dog treats — Chicken Jerky Strips manufactured by Import-Pingyang Pet Product Co. and Chicken Jerky manufactured by Shanghai Bestro Trading — were removed from its stores on July 26, Wal-Mart spokeswoman Deisha Galberth said in a statement.

    “After 17 sets of tests, “the latest advice from our testing laboratory shows trace levels of melamine,” Galberth said.

    http://www.fda.gov/consumer/up.....92807.html

    Caution in Feeding Dogs Chicken Jerky FDA-Updated September 28, 2007

    “To date, FDA has not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. The agency has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.

    “FDA continues to actively investigate this problem.

    http://www.sun-sentinel.com/bu.....4945.story

    South Florida Sun Sentinel November 3, 2007

    “Continuing investigations by the Food and Drug Administration and a Cornell University team, which began about two months ago, have uncovered nothing dangerous in the products and have not definitively tied a spike in cases of a rare kidney disorder to the treats. The FDA has not requested any recalls of jerky treats. But the investigation is not yet completed.

    “Officials with Wal-Mart, the discount chain that removed two brands of Chinese-made jerky treats in July, said the company has no plans to restock those items. One was from Shanghai Bestro Trading and one from Import-Pingyang Pet Product Co.

    OK–let’s reverse the situation–in the case of the Bestro/Pingyang Pet Product Jerky Treats, 16 tests at an unknown number of independent labs and the FDA labs could not find the melamine. Shall we class all of them as having invalid or unreliable findings? WalMart apparently took the positive melamine finding from one of the 17 tests they ordered for this seriously enough to discontinue carrying the product–something none of the PF companies whose products have had positive acetaminophen test results via ExperTox have done.

    Ah, “independent labs”–they’re the stock answer when no names of them are given:

    http://waggintrainblog.com/?p=12

    September 26, 2007

    “ADI Pet manufactures the Waggin’ Train Brand of treats using facilities and safety protocols for human food preparation so that the highest quality can be maintained for our pets. In addition, our treats have been tested extensively by FDA as well as third party laboratories….”

    Everyone’s checked out clean through their “independent labs”–yet there is still a problem with these jerky treats–FDA has not posted that their investigation has ended–but those “independent labs” allow everybody to try saying, “Not MY product!”

  34. kb says:

    “i’m really weary of this controversy over results coming from expertox and i’m wondering if there might be a way to put this to rest once and for all. i’d like to see the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation or a similar organization do a blind test in which they send samples to expertox, fda and uc/davis. in this test, they would have “clean” samples, and some they themselves adulterated with acetaminophen and/or other contaminants. the labs would not know where the samples came from… that is, they would not know that it was actually an evaluation of their competence. only a2la would know who got which samples. i think the results of a test like that might prove to be very interesting.”

    I think Pat’s idea is great. How would we arrange this?

  35. Katie says:

    If memory serves me….Expertox is CAP accredited and believe me that is not easy to get! Until all labs follow the same testing methods it will be apples and oranges. And, me thinks the FDA likes it that way as does the PFI. So I trust Expertox.

    Whatever happened to the Menu food tests????

    Since the oasis reports still show lots of contaminated product including glutens….leaves me to believe pets will be at risk for a long time. Wish the FDA and PFI would be willing to accept and stop contaminated product.

    Everytime I read of new contamination findings - and now date rate drug on kids toys! I know in my heart that home cooking is the only safe food for my dog.

    Katie

  36. Jenny Bark says:

    I can’t add anything to what you all have already said except I agree with all of you and thanks I don’t think i’ll ever go back to any pfi food no matter what they ever do.

    I just really wish I could get my Kitty to eat organ meat. She will only eat a tiny bit of turkey liver & she can’t eat any fish. I keep trying so hard & have used every trick I could find on the net She is such a good eater except for that. It really makes me wonder what the pfi puts in their food that my Kitty would eat it. I have to use vits until I can get her to eat more organ meat. Da!! the He!! with the pfi.

  37. pat says:

    kb, the logical place to start would be a letter (or letters) to the exec director of a2la, preferably by a senator or congressperson. sen durbin or rep. delauro might want to help with this, or if you are able to convince reps from your state to take an interest, that would be good too… the more the merrier. if a2la could be persueded to carry out a test like this, it would be up to them to determine the best way to present the samples while maintaining anonymity.

  38. Claudia says:

    Trudy,

    I had a cat who was “allergic” to Purina One (when I was feeding this garbage) and after I switched to Orijen and Acana — voila, no more allergy. I guess it depends on what your cat is allergic to. Mine was not good with chemicals and crap– fancy that. Here’s the product’s website if you’d like to check the ingredients:

    www.championpetfoods.com

  39. Anonymous says:

    http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/SA.....cet_PI.pdf

    http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/sa.....taminophen

    http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/SA.....htm#acetam

    http://www.fda.gov/oc/po/firmr.....05_05.html

  40. Ann H says:

    I’m weary too of the “trace” or no levels given and not knowing if it is under the MDL of .1ppm of Expertox.

    I think it is time to examine the levels Expertox reports as positive findings and focus on those with amounts reported OVER “trace”.

    Ask Expertox what “trace” means.

    Is “trace” under their MDL of .1ppm?

  41. Anonymous says:

    FWIW, the chemical found in Aqua Dots is much cheaper than the chemical that was supposed to be used.

  42. Jenny Bark says:

    Anonymous, thanks for the grreat links.

  43. Anonymous says:

    You’re welcome Jenny Bark. IMO- does it matter if it’s a “trace”? If it’s there in that amount there’s no reason to think it wasn’t or hasn’t been there in higher amounts. Not all dogs and cats were affected by the same recalled food. This doesn’t make the ones that died any less dead.

    Whether it was melamine with something, or something else, something killed. Explore all avenues and keep an open mind. Remember the early lab results from NY and Canada?

  44. Anonymous says:

    OT- more or less. Questions to ask:

    Historically, have pet food recalls followed major drug recalls?

    Many of you have vet bills from the past when your dog or cat was ill
    or died. If these were unusual or perplexing cases, do the dates fall within a few months of major drug recalls?

    Did your pets symptoms match those of overdose to these drugs?

    Ask your vet if their practice keeps statistics on illness. They can usually determine whether an illness is chronic or acute, or an unusual case. If logs are created on a daily basis it would be much easier to spot trends. Waiting for an “ah ha!” moment in a busy practice sometimes takes awhile unless someone is keeping track.

    The AVMA is starting to be more proactive. Let your vet know this type of involvement is important to you.

  45. logical says:

    let’s think logically here…how can one small store in one state in one city have problems. I have had my dogs on Eaglepack for a year and no problems. In fact they have never looked and acted better. Does acetaminophen cause vomiting, diarrhea, itching, eyes swelling, hives, conjunctivitis, tremors, and some unexplained aggression, the signs that the pet store owner claims the customers had…no. In fact, the website listed above on symptoms of acetaminophen poisoning in dogs and cats might include depression, weakness and difficulty breathing.
    K Tremell is right, Expertox claimed they found acetaminophen in Canidae and Innova as well some time ago. And the store still carries these foods. In fact I think the same store order those tests too.
    Eaglepack and the FDA have tested random samples, Expertox tested one sample from one store. There is nothing scientific about this kind of testing. I haven’t seen any reports on this sight from customers who have been using Eaglepack for some time that have problems, nor any who have been feeding Eaglepack and have had great results. I know they are out there. Speak up! This store owner is trashing Eaglepack for some reason.

  46. Kobi says:

    Just recently we got a sample bag for some Holistic dog food given to us to try out. Two days ago we tried the new unopened sample bag. We gave some to our Mini Schnauzer ‘Sydney’. He had one third of a cup of - Chicken and Rice - that night for his supper.

    During the night he was moving around the bed more than he usually would and the following morning his face was all swollen and the top of his nose was bleeding. The swelling could be clearly seen around both eyes and all around his mouth. We went to our vet and she identified what has happened to be a sever reaction to something.

    Our yard is fenced and we have 3 other dogs that share the same play area and living quarters. None of the others was affected only Sydney. The other dogs are a Yorkie, a Jack Russell and a Border Collie. We do compete in dog sports and we take very good care of our dogs. The only thing that was different between the four - was that Sydney got the Holistic Dog Food from Eagle Pack that night.

    All our dogs are physically fit and in very good health. All of them compete in Agility, some do Agility, Flyball, Disc, etc….

    The reaction to the dog food came rather fast and very severe…

    You can see what it looks like here.

    In the case the link doesn’t work use this URL –> www.kobi-jrt.com

    I hope this will help some other dogs and pet owners.

    Kobi

  47. Walt says:

    I have been using Eagle Pack Original Small bites for about 14 yrs now for my german shephards without any problems. Also, several kennels I am aware of have been using it exclusively with no problems.

    Having said that, As I was pouring a bag of Original Small Bites into a large storage container, I happened to look into the opened bag. Sitting there was a yellow push tack. I immediately called eagle pack and they informed me this was impossible and asked me if I was a trouble maker and insinuated I was fabricating what I had discovered! Needless to say, no manufacturer is going to own up to a problem of this type!

    Walt

  48. Boxerluver says:

    I have been feeding my 9 yr old pit lab mix and my 3 yr old boxer eagle pack senior holistic select for a year. As a long time boxer owner I am aware that boxers are prone to cancer but they usually don’t get it untill they are old. After feeding this food for a year over time my boxer grew 5 bumps on her body. I went to the vet and he tested them 4 of them came back binine and the 5th was a tumor. I believe feeding my dogs eagle pack senior holistic select had something to do with these random growths on my dog at such a young age.

  49. DCovey says:

    I have 2 dogs: one 10 years of age, and one 4 years of age. Both are of extraordinary pedigree, are exercised for a total of 2 miles each day, compete in trials, and are v-e-r-y well taken care of. When I fed my 10 year old Eagle Holistic Senior, and my 4 year old Eagle Holistic Large and Giant Breed puppy, both dogs vomited and would attempt to eat mud in our fenced in back yard during play sessions and training. A check up at the vet turned up nothing re: of disease origin, though the vet suggested a week long diet of brown rice, vegetables and beef with a spoonful of organic yoghurt to restore intestinal flora.
    Once I followed the vet’s advice by feeding both dogs his suggested home made diet, the vomiting stopped and the mud eating ceased. I believe feeding my dogs Eagle Pack Holistic Senior and Eagle Pack Holistic Large and Giant Breed Puppy had a lot to do with both dogs vomiting, and the growths on my younger dog.

  50. tami says:

    no one said about any dogs dying, and the lab who first tested and found that in eagle they started their own dog and cat food 3 weeks before this finding, wonder why? to get others off the food and into their own, i bet you didnt know that did ya, i have fed eagle pack dog food for 17 years, you heard it right 17 years, i have working labs for hunting and i have a dock dog as well along with 63 huskies for dog sledding. They are and always will be in the best shape from eagle pack, i sat here and read one post that got blown into this thread and along the way things got worst and worst, and now include dogs dying and not one has. The FDA found nothing, they are who we trust not some lower company trying to market their own dog food. Yes Eagle did make a few open statements to all when they went public answered everyone at the same time. The results were also published but it seem no one here on this thread bother to look for them.. but were the first to talk with not all the facts known. Would you like to be judged by some stranger that doesn’t have their own facts correct? I think not. Anyways then the scare came back a few years ago and many dogs passed away from it, Eagle was clean all the way they buy all they ingredients from the US not over seas like so many do.. As was/is safe always. Not asking for you to take my word on things but i am asking you to do some back ground checks, research and get your facts before judging others

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