FDA Press Conference: 5/17/07

Itchmo liveblogged the 2pm Eastern FDA press conference. This is not a transcript, but a report of the event.

Here is a summary of today’s FDA press conference: (Transcript now available)

Fish and Fish Feed: The contaminated fish feed has been recalled. Two commercial fish farms had the contaminated fish feed: one in Hawaii and one in Washington state. Both went through testing of their fish and both farms came back negative for melamine. Fish feed was not able to be tested because it was all consumed. For the hatcheries, the fish are tiny and the feed has been recalled, so the fish are not being fed the contaminated fish feed and since the fish are tiny, there should be no health risk. There is no import alert on the fish as of yet.

Import Alert/Domestic Assignment: Since April 27, 46 shipments of vegetable protein concentrate have been detained. None of these shipments have been proven to be melamine free, so the FDA is still detaining the shipments until they are satisfied. With the domestic protein assignment, investigators have gone into companies that have received vegetable protein concentrate from China and collected samples to test for melamine. They collected 63 samples from various states: AZ, CA, CT, IA, MN, NH. No positive results were found. 37 tested negative, 23 are pending, and 3 could not be analyzed (these three were a mixture of rare dog chews and gel capsules, so it could not be tested).

Customs and Border Protection: CBP is undertaking testing of wheat, corn gluten and rice protein concentrate. They began to test samples from China on 4/30 and on 5/2, they expanded testing to all countries. They want to amend the sampling process, so that there can be a random sampling protocol.

Investigation in China: Not too much was said about the investigation in China and says that specifics cannot be discussed. They said that it was a normal amount of time for the investigators to be able to enter into China because there are certain protocols and they don’t have the authority in a foreign arena.

FDA will be looking into other ingredients that should be reviewed or tested.

A full report of the FDA conference after the jump.

Here is the panel for today’s press conference:

-David Acheson, M.D., assistant commissioner for food protection, Office of the Commissioner, FDA
-Curt Mann, D.V.M., deputy undersecretary for food safety, USDA
-Vera Adams, executive director, Commercial Targeting and Enforcement, CBP
-Stephen Sundlof, D.V.M., Ph.D., director, Center for Veterinary Medicine, FDA
-Michael Rogers, director, Division of Field Investigations, Office of Regulatory Affairs, FDA
-Michael Herndon, press officer, Office of Public Affairs, FDA

Herndon intros.

Acheson: wants to update us on 1) info on status of fish farms and hatcheries; 2) inspections and investigations with import and domestic surveillance
General overview - fish feed has been recalled and the wheat gluten that had been received from China is from the same company that led to pet food recalls — not much harm with melamine tainted feed
2 are commercial fish farms- 1 in Hawaii and 1 in WA
Hawaii: testing done by a private lab with an endorsed FDA process — testing of the fish from the fish farm have been negative for melamine- result the company has started harvesting fish again
WA: they have also tested fish by FDA and they have proven to be negative for melamine- was not able to test any of the fish food because it was all consumed.
Hatcheries: fish are tiny and the feed has been recalled, so they are not being fed the fish food and since they are tiny fish, there should be no risk to public health — not going directly into commerce

Inspection- Import Alert: since 4/27, 46 shipments of veg protein from China have been detained- none of these shipments have been proven to be melamine free so they are still being detained until FDA is satisfied
Domestic protein assignment: going on for a couple of weeks of manufacturers that received veg protein from China- investigators have gone into companies and raised awareness and collected samples for melamine- collected 63 samples from variety of states:AZ, CA, CT, IA, MN, NH- no positive result of melamine -37 were negative, 23 pending, and 3 could not be analyzed (mixture of rare dog chews and gel capsules, so could not be tested)

Adams (CBP):
-CBP is undertaking testing of wheat, corn gluten and rice protein concentrate- sampling samples from China on 4/30 and then on 5/2, expanded to all countries — analyzing samples for melamine
-since beg. of operation, lab analysis is 80% complete and has found no melamine or other melamine related compounds. since large % has been tested, eval operation if sampling process can be amended and have a random sampling protocol– continue to work with FDA

Q&A:

Boston Globe: what you make of the Chinese govt statement that the US shouldn’t take any stringent action against any other suppliers than the other 2 that have already been invest?
Acheson: the import alert began with a problem in wheat gluten and melamine and expanded to other veg protein conc - we clearly believe that this is the right action- our primary mission is to safeguard public health in the US
BG: the various fish tested negative- are they clearly negative or are there traces?
Acheson: the test only tests for a certain low level- it is below the limit of detection using our sensitive testing.

Petconnection: FDA is sampling pet food- how many samples? any positive? results?
Acheson: not aware of how many we have tested- not aware that any came back positive- don’t know specific answer- the testing is still ongoing

USA Today: is customs sampling the shipments that the FDA is detaining?
CBP: we are targeting using our own systems within our scope of this operation
USA Today: who is the importer for cereal byproducts?
A: not prepared to answer that question– all suspect sources go back to the 2 Chinese companies

CBS News: don’t understand about last question on if custom is detaining the product? How do you prove if the product doesn’t have melamine?
CBP: both CBP and FDA can detain products- we can put on hold independently to FDA- we are sampling shipments and sending to the lab and we reporting those results to the FDA- then the FDA can review the results
Acheson: shipments will remain on detention until we get the report that they are free from melamine - if shippers use their own testing- their testing has to be validated.
Q: how many shipments?
A: 46 shipments have been detained and none have been released.

LA Times: those 46 have been detained, how many? are they just being tested for melamine?
A: 46 of 46. any veg protein conc from China has been detained. we are testing for melamine and melamine related compound.

WGN: it took several weeks for invest to go to China- there was diff getting visas and everything was cleared out of the facilities. how assured can we be that there aren’t others that are involved? how helpful have the Chinese been? it has taken awhile to get answers and we don’t have answers. how assured that veg proteins can be safe?
A: with regard to the time, it’s not simple to get an invest from SF to China- certain protocols- not slower than normal. it certainly could be going on at other manuf which is why we have an import alert- that is why nothing can be imported if it is proven to be negative
Q: where are you with those discussions of invest?
A: can’t give you any specifics

WA Post: how many suppliers produced these 46 shipments? CBP have selected many samples and are they from China?
A: 46 shipments - only veg protein conc from China- all 46 have been detained- in order for them to move forward, we have to receive info that they are neg for melamine- we can’t analyze if we’re concerned with the results- as of now, none of 46 can be moved on.
CBP: we are taking samples from all countries: corn gluten, wheat gluten and rice protein conc

Market Watch: it may be going on in other countries- what if fish have been being fed this to China over a long period of time
A: we have been testing fish for melamine- no import alert are in the fish
Q: how does melamine and cyanuric acid come into a solid
A: melamine and cya. acid in there- add the two together- don’t believe the risk assessment has taken into account of the syngerism- haven’t demonstrate of synergism

Q: the Chinese said that no sign of the chemical has been found- the FDA has expressed satisfaction of quality control
A: the invest have returned and I have not seen the report- the FDA are continuing the import alert until we are satisfied that this is under control
Q: is the statement is accurate or not accurate
A: we have continued concerns from imports from China- with our import alert
Q: how long did it take for the chinese to get there? do you think the Chinese took any concealing during that period.
A: we don’t know what happened before we get there. we don’t have the same authority in a foreign arena than in the domestic arena- these products aren’t under our jurisdicition - we did meet with the HSIQU- the 2 companies aren’t making that product anymore- having further dialog of quality product that is coming out of China- that doesn’t negate what we are doing now

Tribune: quantify the 46 shipments in tonnage? what % of veg. protein conc grown in our country and what % we import?
A: don’t know the tonnage. don’t know off the top of my head
Q: any update on the fifth contaminant?
A: I’m not sure what you are leading to-
Q: redacted document?
A: fifth contaminant- there is a screen that we utilize- standard screen- covers a range of chemicals- we redacted it because it was of a sensitive nature

Baltimore Sun: the fish in the hatchery from China are still being held?
A: Yes
Q: random sampling? what were you doing before the random sampling?
A: we were doing a deliberate target than a random sampling- some of the all other countries doing a statisically automated testing- still in talks

Congress Daily: can you say if we are working with other countries than China?
A: several years ago, we worked with the Mexican govt in regards to cantaloupe- we gave them advice, involves site visits to help produce a safer product- it worked- continued to test periodically- then when there was a problem with salmonella, we worked with them again.
Q:when will it be wrapped up with China?
A: not sure when we will wrap up

Bloomberg: how long do you plan on testing these products? is there a deadline?
A: the import alert explains what needs to be done to get off the import alert. there are various criteria that are very lengthy.
Q: could you go back and talk about the dog food?
A: we are collecting samples- collected 63 samples

NPR: is FDA collecting the review of other food ingreds? what other additives that be targeted?
A: that’s a really good question- we thought what other ingreds or products that we should be thinking of- our testing is based on risk and using the conventional way of thinking like wheat gluten wouldn’t be high risk- this situation made us think in a different direction- what other ingreds might be broadly used or that we import of- we are looking into it
Q: how do you begin that process
A: we look at the ingreds and linking with what is used widely

Reuters: 46 shipments- can you walk me through how the testing has been done- done in bulk, bags?
A: there is no specific strategy- company goes through a reasonable testing process and present it to the FDA, and we review and if we are not satisfied, we say no.
Q: how many tests per shipment per load? is this protein in bulks or bags?
A: it can come in any kind of form- we’re not going to tell them the specific number of tests-

CNN: puzzled that you can test for melamine related compounds in fish flesh but not in chicken or pork flesh? are there technical reasons for this? what is the working hypothesis?
A: initially, we were testing the feed and the raw ingred. like wheat gluten and rice protein conc.- we measure melamine, cy. acid, and 2 other chemicals related to melamine- we were able to measure our tests to measure all 4 of those. what the lab has been trying to do has been trying to measure those all 4 in animal tissue. it’s much harder to measure in the tissue versus the feed- working to develop the cyan. acid part. working with muscle and tissue samples is difficult to test in wheat gluten
Q: can you use the other half of the FDA (like pharm. companies) to test? the pharm companies have better equipment than universities- are you outreaching to larger labs?
A: our research and the group that deals with this- it’s not just a food group- the expertise is all across the board- one of the difficulties is handling food matrices- a lot of faith that our team has been looking everywhere for help- it’s something that we can follow up and we can pass this suggestion along.

End of press conference.

83 Responses to “FDA Press Conference: 5/17/07”

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  1. 4lgdfriend says:

    Good work E. Hamilton. So sorry for your loss. Trying to prevent one of my own right now.

  2. martin says:

    JanC

    LOL @ melaJello shots

  3. Debbie4747 says:

    Of course all the above mentioned foods should be served on plates made from melamine. After all, isn’t that what the crap was intended for anyway?

  4. 4lgdfriend says:

    byproducts schmyproducts - dead diseased dying? oh no, nothing but ultra holistic natural top quality petfood ingredients that supply all the nutritional needs to keep a pfi hack healthy and waggin his tail

  5. 4lgdfriend says:

    who issued the gag order on the independent testing groups????????

  6. 4lgdfriend says:

    Why haven’t the petfood samples been tested by the FDA?

  7. E. Hamilton says:

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    - Develop some self-discipline
    - Use your killfile
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    - Scoop out your eyes with a spoon
    - Stab yourself in the head with a butcher knife

    If all else fails, remove your computer from your house and cancel your
    Internet service.

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    Your options include the following:
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    The FBI®

  8. Katie says:

    Itchmo,

    Is there anyway to find out about the gel caps that they can’t check do to the nature of the product? Wondering if they are some Omega-3 gel caps for dogs ? I live in AZ, so a little concerned… and wonder whose product it is.

    Katie

  9. purringfur says:

    4lgdfriend Says:

    May 17th, 2007 at 3:08 pm
    sensitive nature as in delib terrorism and we know we can’t take China to task?

    sensitive as in MUCH more poisonous than the mela-hoax substance that was safe to be id’d because “little is known” about the effects [compared to say, aminopterin]?

    what could it be? what could it be?????
    ……………..

    Who knows what the 5th substance is? Remember the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory early on that found aminopterin (rat poison) in 2 out of 3 pet food samples, and once the melamine story (relatively harmless substance) hit, no one mentioned the rat poison again… Too much for the public to handle???

    Remember that this was a state-of-the-art lab set up as part of FERN (Food Emergency Response Network), part of the Homeland Security sector, one of many labs set up after 9/11 to deal with the possibility of terrorists contaminating our food supply. Don’t you think a lab such as this knows what its findings are — a lab specially equipped to detect unusual chemicals?????

    And remember how we keep hearing about just MELAMINE in the FDA press releases, and there is little to no reference to cyanuric acid. Hmmmm. Something smells fishy, and (as incredible as it is), it’s not the farm-raised cat fish from China!

    Quotes below…..

    “The new tests follow a press conference in Albany on March 23 at which researchers from the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Food Laboratory reported that they had identified aminopterin in samples of the pet food…

    …the state’s laboratory includes special equipment and methods for identifying unusual chemicals. State toxicologists said that they had identified significant levels of aminopterin in two out of three samples of the pet food.

    Aminopterin, related to folic acid, is used in some countries as a rodenticide, although it illegal for such use in the United States and Canada.”

    http://www.news.cornell.edu/st.....te.kr.html

  10. purringfur says:

    E. Hamilton: May I have a few paper towels to wipe my monitor? Somehow, water is covering my screen! ;)

  11. bosley says:

    Kati from the look of the site today we might as well get a shot and forget any questions other than drinking ? did everyone talking about dog food go else where? ?? fun is fine but this is not funny stuff to many -sorry gang I am gone now dont have to tell me I am a party pooper , no time to part yet ,

  12. menusux says:

    http://www.canada.com/national.....mp;k=59509

    China food scare threatens exports as test costs soar
    Reuters
    Published: Thursday, May 17, 2007

    “Foreign buyers of Chinese food are asking for safety tests following the melamine pet food debacle, threatening the country’s competitive position in a wide range of markets, including organic ingredients.

    “Industry officials said U.S. and other firms had demanded a certificate that farm products were free of melamine.

    “The industry officials said Japan, which accounts for about a quarter of China’s farm product exports, had also recommended importers check for melamine in Chinese products, such as rice flour or wheat gluten, for use in animal feed.

    “”The safety tests for raw materials are likely to get tougher,” said a senior official from a Japanese food processing plant in China.

    “”Eventually they could demand traceability similar to that for non-GMO products … which would raise costs. Given higher costs and credibility, there’s a question if you would still want to buy raw materials from China.”"

    Looks like it’s going to be cheaper to purchase in one’s own nation or nearby….

  13. 5CatMom says:

    What is the mysterious 5th substance?

    The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets found aminopterin levels of 40 ppm in some Menu Foods’ samples.

    Here’s a good article from Scientific American:

    http://www.sciam.com/article.c.....8F34C09E95

  14. Joan says:

    Mass poisonings are common in China, which has been struggling to improve a dismal food safety record. Manufacturers often mislabel food products or add illegal substances to them. Cooks routinely disregard hygiene rules or mistakenly use industrial chemicals instead of salt and other ingredients.

    http://au.health.yahoo.com/070410/40/16nhc.html

  15. Katie says:

    Bosley,

    You are so right. There are still sick animals. There are still some of us wondering what food or treats, etc. caused the problems our pets have. Products not yet recalled. Too many questions and to few answers.

    Katie

  16. menusux says:

    Something to give Mr. SmithBucklin & Mr. Levick pause:

    http://www.businessweek.com/ma.....op+stories

    Selling Pet Owners Peace Of Mind
    BusinessWeek May 28, 2007 issue

    “Ken Park, the president and founder of Artemis Pet Food Co., based in North Hollywood, Calif., had always thought his company’s emphasis on quality would make its chow a top choice for pet lovers. Now his commitment to using natural, North American-grown ingredients suitable for humans is attracting lots of notice.

    “Since the contamination was discovered in rivals’ products, sales for Park’s $20 million, 35-employee company have jumped by 25% to 50%. “Customers are looking for pet food products that are U.S.-made, with U.S. ingredients,” says Park.

    “Other small, domestic producers of pet food, such as Freshpet and Nature’s Variety, are seeing results similar to Artemis’. “A lot of the smaller guys have jumped to the forefront,” says Bob Vetere, president of the American Pet Products Manufacturers Assn.”

    “Park says he initially considered outsourcing more ingredients and some production, but he realized he would lose his point of distinction. “We can keep this all under one roof and keep a better eye on things,” he says.”

  17. ann says:

    YaYa - check this out….
    http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=9604

  18. Sylvia says:

    Money can buy everything but the courage and ethics necessary to do the right thing in difficult times.

    “Steve Says:

    May 17th, 2007 at 3:53 pm
    These Guys should hire Duane Ekedahl new PR Firm

    http://www.levick.com/expertise/out/attack.php

  19. Lorie says:

    Sorry for repost everyone moved since I got home:

    Lorie Says:

    May 17th, 2007 at 7:02 pm

    Katie,

    I am so sorry about your dog test results this whole thing makes me so mad. After hearing you talk about labs being semi normal to worse makes me nervous. Maybe Geisha having anormal lab was just a fluke. Geez.

    Genny,

    I am glad you told her to get off the friskies. If these freakin people would just tell the truth, and what is up with this busy body making comments about our blogs. What a weirdo

  20. Zoe says:

    We’re closing in on another Friday. I wonder if we’ll see more recalls.

  21. bosley says:

    ( WELL now we cant be safe with beef )
    Company Recalls 129,000 Pounds of Beef
    AP
    KALAMAZOO, Mich. (May 17) - A meat company is recalling 129,000 pounds of beef products in 15 states because of possible E. coli contamination, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said

  22. martin says:

    Wheat, fish, chicken, pork, beef,….the list keeps growing and growing. Do you think the government get’s it yet? When are they going to REALLY DO something about it?

  23. Helen says:

    Come on folks! It is perfectly safe to covered in hot tar, covered with melachicken feathers and poked with pitchforks. The FDA says it is perfectly fine. What is the big deal? Bloggers out of control ranting that it is not safe to be dipped in tar and feathers and poked with pitchforks! Really, they must be hysterical.

  24. Cynthia says:

    Freedom of Information Act??? Huh, Not a chance, they got it in writing…

    Getting Information from FDA
    by Dori Stehlin
    http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/getinfo.html

    Each year, thousands of people contact FDA to request information on a gamut of FDA-regulated items, from video display terminals, pet food, and tanning booths to infant formula, the blood supply, and newly approved medical devices, drugs, and biological products.

    Freedom of Information Staff

    Occasionally, consumers seek information that has not been prepared for public dissemination. The Freedom of Information Act ensures public access to most agency documents, including:
    • enforcement records, including product recall notifications
    • summaries of the basis of approval for new drugs, medical devices, and biologics
    • regulatory letters.

    The Freedom of Information Act pertains only to existing records and is not a research service that compiles information not already available and identifiable. An FOI request for agency records can be denied only under set guidelines. Documents that may be exempt from the Freedom of Information Act include:
    • trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information
    • certain interagency or intra-agency memos or letters
    • personnel, medical and similar files that, if released, would constitute an invasion of privacy
    • certain records compiled for law enforcement purposes.

    All FOI requests must be made in writing and must include the requestor’s name, address, and telephone number, as well as a specific statement of the records being sought. Consumers are charged for search time and duplication (with no charge for the first two hours of search time and the first 100 pages of duplication). Search and review time charges range from $18, $36, or $64 per hour, depending on the level of FDA employee filling the request. The photocopying rate is 10 cents per page for standard-size paper or the actual cost per page for odd-size paper. Requests incurring charges of less than $15 are filled without charge.

    For additional information or to make an FOI request, contact the Freedom of Information Staff, FDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 12A-30, Rockville, MD 20857, or send requests via facsimile to (301) 443-1726. Additional information is also available from FDA’s Electronic Freedom of Information Reading Room.

    Our Lips Are Sealed

    Many information requests to FDA must be denied due to the confidential nature of the data. FDA employees are prohibited by law from divulging information considered either proprietary or confidential. For example, FDA employees cannot release any information on unapproved drugs unless the manufacturer has given the agency permission or has already released the information to the public.

    Dori Stehlin is a member of FDA’s public affairs staff.Getting Information from FDA
    by Dori Stehlin
    http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/getinfo.html

    Each year, thousands of people contact FDA to request information on a gamut of FDA-regulated items, from video display terminals, pet food, and tanning booths to infant formula, the blood supply, and newly approved medical devices, drugs, and biological products.

    Freedom of Information Staff

    Occasionally, consumers seek information that has not been prepared for public dissemination. The Freedom of Information Act ensures public access to most agency documents, including:
    • enforcement records, including product recall notifications
    • summaries of the basis of approval for new drugs, medical devices, and biologics
    • regulatory letters.

    The Freedom of Information Act pertains only to existing records and is not a research service that compiles information not already available and identifiable. An FOI request for agency records can be denied only under set guidelines. Documents that may be exempt from the Freedom of Information Act include:
    • trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information
    • certain interagency or intra-agency memos or letters
    • personnel, medical and similar files that, if released, would constitute an invasion of privacy
    • certain records compiled for law enforcement purposes.

    All FOI requests must be made in writing and must include the requestor’s name, address, and telephone number, as well as a specific statement of the records being sought. Consumers are charged for search time and duplication (with no charge for the first two hours of search time and the first 100 pages of duplication). Search and review time charges range from $18, $36, or $64 per hour, depending on the level of FDA employee filling the request. The photocopying rate is 10 cents per page for standard-size paper or the actual cost per page for odd-size paper. Requests incurring charges of less than $15 are filled without charge.

    For additional information or to make an FOI request, contact the Freedom of Information Staff, FDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 12A-30, Rockville, MD 20857, or send requests via facsimile to (301) 443-1726. Additional information is also available from FDA’s Electronic Freedom of Information Reading Room.

    Our Lips Are Sealed

    Many information requests to FDA must be denied due to the confidential nature of the data. FDA employees are prohibited by law from divulging information considered either proprietary or confidential. For example, FDA employees cannot release any information on unapproved drugs unless the manufacturer has given the agency permission or has already released the information to the public.

    Dori Stehlin is a member of FDA’s public affairs staff.Getting Information from FDA
    by Dori Stehlin
    http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/getinfo.html

    Each year, thousands of people contact FDA to request information on a gamut of FDA-regulated items, from video display terminals, pet food, and tanning booths to infant formula, the blood supply, and newly approved medical devices, drugs, and biological products.

    Freedom of Information Staff

    Occasionally, consumers seek information that has not been prepared for public dissemination. The Freedom of Information Act ensures public access to most agency documents, including:
    • enforcement records, including product recall notifications
    • summaries of the basis of approval for new drugs, medical devices, and biologics
    • regulatory letters.

    The Freedom of Information Act pertains only to existing records and is not a research service that compiles information not already available and identifiable. An FOI request for agency records can be denied only under set guidelines. Documents that may be exempt from the Freedom of Information Act include:
    • trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information
    • certain interagency or intra-agency memos or letters
    • personnel, medical and similar files that, if released, would constitute an invasion of privacy
    • certain records compiled for law enforcement purposes.

    All FOI requests must be made in writing and must include the requestor’s name, address, and telephone number, as well as a specific statement of the records being sought. Consumers are charged for search time and duplication (with no charge for the first two hours of search time and the first 100 pages of duplication). Search and review time charges range from $18, $36, or $64 per hour, depending on the level of FDA employee filling the request. The photocopying rate is 10 cents per page for standard-size paper or the actual cost per page for odd-size paper. Requests incurring charges of less than $15 are filled without charge.

    For additional information or to make an FOI request, contact the Freedom of Information Staff, FDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 12A-30, Rockville, MD 20857, or send requests via facsimile to (301) 443-1726. Additional information is also available from FDA’s Electronic Freedom of Information Reading Room.

    Our Lips Are Sealed

    Many information requests to FDA must be denied due to the confidential nature of the data. FDA employees are prohibited by law from divulging information considered either proprietary or confidential. For example, FDA employees cannot release any information on unapproved drugs unless the manufacturer has given the agency permission or has already released the information to the public.

    Dori Stehlin is a member of FDA’s public affairs staff.

  25. Steve says:

    Lick Your Chops recall May 17

    http://healthypetfoodsinc.com/newletter.cfm

  26. Katie says:

    What is the old saying “it isn’t over till the fat lady sings”, I don’t think the fat lady will be singing anytime soon….

    Katie

  27. Helen says:

    Hey, it’s only Thursday. What’s wrong with this company? Won’t all their buddies be mad they couldn’t wait until Friday at midnight like everyone else? Will they get kicked out of the litterbox for that?

  28. Deb says:

    Bosley, you are so right….we are not safe with beef. I just finished a book called, The Deadly Feast. It’s about the history of Mad Cow, they think the worst will hit about 2015. There is nothing left to eat…..we can’t even graze on grass!

    Helen, melachicken….too funny. I even had a wiff of dirty chicken coop mixed with the wonderful smell of that Boontonware co. (Boontonware made ‘meladishware’….yuck….that smell has haunted me since childhood.)

  29. Helen says:

    Deb, I can’t take credit for melachicken.

  30. Deb says:

    Helen, sorry I noticed the term in your post, it’s just too funny.

  31. Cynthia says:

    Sorry for the double post. Don’t know what happend.

  32. Itchmo » Blog Archive » Recall Update: Friday says:

    […] FDA press conference summary (transcript): […]

  33. Patty L says:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/.....id=topnews

    Good but scary article just now in Wash. Post re China and its very large number of tainted imports here. The Feds may change nothing, though.

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