Top Veterinary Breakthroughs Of 2007

Dog

Here are some of the top veterinary breakthroughs of 2007 discussed on “Good Morning America” with Dr. Marty Becker:

  • Melanoma Vaccine: This is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine approved in the United States for any species, human, or animal.
  • Dental Disease Vaccine: The vaccine targets the three kinds of Porphyromonas bacteria that cause most of the periodontal disease. This disease is the most commonly diagnosed disease in veterinary medicine.
  • Canine Transdermal Device: This allows vaccines to be injected directly into the muscles instead of the blood vessel. The immune response of the animal is better and it may be less painful for animals also.

  • Genetics Test: Not sure what kind of dog you have? This DNA-based test identifies more than 130 breeds that may be present in a mixed breed dog and helps you finally figure out what kind of dog you have.
  • Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Health: Veterinarians are using probiotics to prevent diarrhea and promote good intestinal balance which leads to better health. Studies have shown that probiotics can help keep a normal balance of good and bad bacteria that live in the intestines.
  • Neutraceuticals to help treat and prevent arthritis: This liver-flavored chewable tablet provides glucosamine, chondroitin, green-lipped mussel and hyaluronic acid balanced with omega-3 fatty acids, minerals and antioxidants for healthy canine joint function and connective tissue.
  • Source: ABC News

    (Thanks Stefani)

19 Responses to “Top Veterinary Breakthroughs Of 2007”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Would that be Dr. Marty Becker paid shill for Hills?

    I wonder if Dr. Becker supports mandatory provision of bvaccine risk information to petowners by vets????

    (P.S. I’m not holding my breath)

  2. sadbuttrue says:

    The top veterinary breakthrough is that some folks have to vomit themselves dry before taking a pet to the vet. That is how much they love their pets and how much they hate the vets.
    The pet parents do it, because they must , and begrudge every dollar and hate and despise with every vet visit.
    A proud moment for the last days of what used to be an honorable profession.

    The BEST thing about the recall nightmare is that it knocked the shiny off pet food industry’s pimps. Rot and die screaming !

  3. bill says:

    Of the 6 listed, on 2, the use of probiotics & the use of nutriceuticals for arthritis, are of any real use to any pet owners. It’s good to see the vet community is finally catching up to us with these “break-throughs”…. we’ve been using and recommending these for over 20 years.

  4. Gindy says:

    Maybe if the food the pets were fed were made correctly, there would be no need for probiotics to correct the intestinal imbalances created by bad food.

  5. Donna says:

    One question. Are these new vaccines made free of mercury conjuvents ? If not………….time bomb down the road.

  6. Dave says:

    Dental Disease…. primarily caused by too much grains, rice and corn in the dry foods. Instead of treating the disease, why not prevent the disease or get to the root cause ie. eliminate the grains. It is amazing that pet owners feel that that because kibbe is krunchy, it will clean teeth yet most dogs need full teeth cleaning every 3-4 years along with regular brushing. Stop the grain feeding = no/less dental problems.

  7. Holly says:

    I agree with Dave and Donna…. the vets, like the doctors are looking in the wrong direction - for a cure instead of preventing the problem by changing the diet. Raw bones are natures toothbrush. I’m sure the vets are NOT giving out information on vaccine risks, they haven’t done it yet, why would they start now? I’m a vet tech and a homeopath and I have seen FAR to many animals suffer vaccinosis. I’ve even heard some non-holistic vets say that the combination of feeding dry, processed pet foods and vaccinating is a deadly combination. Do your own homework. Become YOUR pets advocate. Get the package inserts for ANY and ALL drugs your vet recommends for your pet (and that includes vaccinations). Arm yourself with knowledge and be ready because your pet COULD be that 1% that negatively reacts/dies. There is nothing wrong with going to your vet for check ups, advice and recommendations - it doesn’t mean you HAVE to follow it. Heck, I do that with my kids and the doctor. Get an opinion and not a prescription! Go to www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com for alternative health info, www.homeovet.com.

    Our pets are what they eat too. Grains = sugar = tartar. If crunching dry dog food was the answer to better dental health, why is it worsening???? Because it is a myth we have bought into. A vaccine for dental health?? Are we really that brainwashed?? It ain’t rocket science - feed a species appropriate diet. If our pets were not meant to eat meat, their canines would not be there. If they were not meant to crush and eat bones, they wouldn’t have the large molars in their mouths for that purpose. Take a raw food challenge - feed 50% raw food to your pets for 4 weeks and just see what a difference it makes. Educate yourself a little bit on making appropriate choices on what to feed by going to www.urbancarnivore.com An all meat diet is not appropriate, you must include bone. Find a source of ground meat/bone. Your pet will LOVE you for it. Would you like to eat corn flakes 24/7? Not me. I haven’t fed dry kibble to my pets for 14 years. I have a 15+ year old lab cross. She runs and walks an hour a day. Maybe I’m on to something!!!!! It’s not a coincidence either. And her teeth? Some need brushing - they ain pretty, but she’s only been on raw food for 1/2 of her life.

    I don’t mean to preach but these are subjects I have devoted my career as an Animal Health Tech to and I feel very passionately about. It has led me to homeopathy as a means to heal without drugs as well.

    Prevention is better than cure!

    Holly - pet guardian and natural alternative advocate for pets’ and humans’ health care choices.

  8. Maureen says:

    Here’s a page from Pfizer on the dental vaccine. I appreciate the posts above and would appreciate any feedback on this particular vaccine. It contains formaldehyde…(I have always been wary of vaccines.)

    http://www.pfizerah.com/PAHimages/msds_us/PH.pdf

  9. kathy says:

    Did I wake up in a different world again today?? What on earth vaccine is administered IV????

    Definitely agree about the neutraceuticals and probiotics–discovered on my own that when a dog has eaten something he maybe shouldn’t have, and is filling my home with toxic gas fumes, within 20 minutes of being given some acidophilus or bifidus, even the real el cheapo kinds, the gas attack is over!

  10. Holly says:

    Vaccines in general contain formeldehyde as a preservative. Go figure that out. A known carcinogen injected directly into the blood stream of living beings, babies and all. No, vaccines are not safe. Trade one disease in for something far more sinister. I prefer to take my chances with the disease. At least I know what I’m dealing with.

  11. stefani says:

    Re: Sadbuttrue said:

    “The top veterinary breakthrough is that some folks have to vomit themselves dry before taking a pet to the vet. That is how much they love their pets and how much they hate the vets. The pet parents do it, because they must , and begrudge every dollar and hate and despise with every vet visit.”

    I actually don’t know what you mean by this comment, LOL, whether you think this is a good thing or not.

    I have to tell you that I don’t see what you describe. What I see is a bunch of committed pet owners who still imagine halos over the heads of every veterinarian they encounter, and assume without proof that every veterinarian is a) an animal lover, and b) competent.

    While some pet owners do complain about costs at the vet (sometimes unfairly and unreasonably), they rarely critically assess the care provided.

    In MY book, this is BACKWARDS.

    While there are many competent, dedicated and honest vets, there are also waaaayyyyy too many incompetent, lazy, and/or dishonest vets. Not all vets are animal lovers — some just don’t want to deal with the quality standards and liability considerations they would have to face in human medicine. And boy, do they LOVE that halo.

    I strongly believe that most pet owners need to be more critical and cynical about veterinary care, and need to take the time to question and evaluate the services provided by the veterinarians they go to. They also need to CHECK THE RECORDS of a vet before placing the care of their pet in his or her hands.

    On the other hand, I think they should STOP complaining about costs when they are assured that the care provided is good. If pets are TRULY members of our family, the way we CLAIM they are, THEN quality care is PRICELESS.

    Veterinarians aren’t volunteers. Number 1, they shouldn’t be expected to perform services for free or nearly free simply because some pet owner begrudges paying them, thinking “you are supposed to be in it to help animals!” How naiive. They’re in it to make a living, folks.

    Veterinarians ALSO aren’t saints. Number, 2, as you are writing that check or handing over that credit card, you have EVERY RIGHT to critically assess and ask questions, make demands, about quality of care. In fact, you have a responsibility to do so.

    I don’t see many pet owners doing that — even the ones who CLAIM they love their pets as members of the family. I see them BLINDLY trusting, and holding on to an image of veterinarians as kindly, do-gooder animal lovers, when in fact these people are service providers. Although a sizable percentage of them went into it because of a love of animals, even for those vets, business interests eventually eclipse that as the primary motivator. And, many of them don’t love animals, sorry — it’s just obviously true.

    But that’s not the point — the point is — are they competent? Are they kind? Are they conscientious? Do they keep up their professional knowledge? Do they run a tight ship, where procedures are in place to ensure patient safety? Do they hire competent employees and ensure their adherence to standards of care, quality, and safety?

    I wish I saw healthy skepticism, but I don’t. I see a bunch of naiive owners failing to assess the quality of care being provided to their pets.

    That is, until their pets suffer a tragedy, as mine did. Then and only then do they begin to “get it” that all vets aren’t wearing halos.

    Stefani
    The Toonces Project
    http://www.TheTooncesProject.com
    “Is Your Pet Safe at the Vet?”

  12. Holly says:

    Stefani makes a lot of good points that I agree with. I have certainly learned that my vet is not God, although I fully believe that some vets do believe that DVM directly translates to GOD. Be your own pets advocate and as Stefani stated, do not assume they have your pets best interest in mind. I hope though that people can find a vet they trust with thier pets. But for me, I will never leave my dog or cat alone in a vet clinic just like I wouldn’t leave my child. I fortunately have not experienced a tragedy. But I worked enough in clinics to know that no one spends the night with the pets and it is unlikely that a vet will go back and check on them in the middle of the night, so why leave them? Not me.

  13. Cathy says:

    I agree with all of you. My guy suffered so much because of vets not caring or not competent enough to find to cause of his problem. An uncaring private practice during the first crisis caused me to end up at a VCA where we saw a different vet every time we went. They were all very interested in taking my money by doing test after test, which I agreed to so that he would get better. Never got any diagnosis though. I moved to another private practice and a vet who was nice, but really didn’t have a clue. He referred me to another ’specialist’ at an animal hospital who also misdiagnosed his problem. Between greed and incompetence, it’s no wonder he’s dead.

    Now I guess they’re looking for new ways to kill pets - just shoot em up with unnecessary vaccines. What animal told them that it was less painful?

    How about just good, healthy food and exercise. That’s what pets really need.

  14. Anonymous says:

    poster: A vaccine for dental health?? Are we really that brainwashed??
    ANSWER: Yes we are.
    An animal eating a species appropriate diet (ie, RAW) composed of high quality, highly assimilable nutrients - AND whose immune system is not compromised by a history of overvaccination and poor diet - does not develop dental disease. This is the vet creating a disease and seeking to profit by marketing a treatment for it (and one that in all probability creates further damage to health). WHY would one get a treatment - any treatment - created by the group that espoused, did not object to, and profited from creation of the disease in the first placed?

  15. Anonymous says:

    Stefani:
    1)would you please be so kind as to inform us how one “checks the records” of a vet before using them? Frankly I doubt we’re going to find a great deal, perhaps if we know exactly what to ask about - which most don’t. Anyway, the noxious and fatal results of many treatments are systemic and show up over time and the owners do not even know the real cause.
    2) I don’t expect vets to be SAINTS - I do expect them not to be MURDERERS.
    3) And I don’t expect to pay someone even one cent for misleading me and harming my pet.
    4) the time to check things out is WAY before you ever write the check. This means being proactive and reading on alternative sources about the dangers likely to be encountered and the alternatives to exposing your animal to them.

  16. Anonymous says:

    as far as probiotics and neutraceuticals:
    Vets and resisted creating health for decades. Now the consumers are wising up en masse (finally - many did long ago) and the tide is turning against them and they have to change their image. Wanna bet some of the same vets “marketing” these products pooh-poohed them not so long ago? It’s all about profit. Money.
    I’m glad if a few animals benefit - but they’re still being harmed overall by many common protocols that profit the vet/pharma establishment so this is not a big change until these dangerous practices are exposed and the truth is told. Given the poor level of nutritional training most vets have I’d love to hear how they explain the benefits of these…

  17. Anonymous says:

    and another good point to remember is: most people have the same fantasy about MDs as altruistic all-knowing saviours and know precious little about creating human health - why should we expect any different level of awareness or approach re their animals health/treatment?

    This is all linked. Big Pharma/Big Med is BIG BUSINESS. PERIOD.
    Read all about the faked research results paid for by big business published in big medical journals - and we’re talking about HUMANS!!! One can only imagine the level of chicanery when it comes to animals.

  18. Stefani says:

    Dear anonymous,

    Actually, I agree with nearly every thing you said. Unfortunately, I was one of the trusting pet owners that had to learn the hard, and very tragic, way.

    You asked:

    1)would you please be so kind as to inform us how one “checks the records” of a vet before using them?

    Yes, you would contact your State’s Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners and file a public records request, requesting hte disciplinary reccords of all vets you were considering.

    A list of state board contact info can be found here:

    http://www.jugglingcats.com/ve....._board.htm

    If you find that any of those links are out of date, you can also go here:

    http://www.aavsb.org/DLR/DLR.aspx

    SOME veterinary boards, notably Virginia, make this information pretty easy to find online.
    See http://www.dhp.virginia.gov/vet/ and click on Case Decisions.

    Others have “license lookup” features that tell you if the vet (or other type of health professional) has had disciplinary action on their license. These sites are NOT very user friendly (I suspect, by design). If you have a hard time with it, feel free to contact me.

    Re: “Frankly I doubt we’re going to find a great deal, perhaps if we know exactly what to ask about - which most don’t.”

    Right, you are right. Any kind of disciplinary record — except for falling short of continuing education credits or a briefly lapsed license — shoudl be taken seriuosly. The vet boards generally strip the public records of the more damning details, so you really have to read between the lines. That’s why ANY record is a bad record –chances are, it was worse than it sounds.

    Re:

    “Anyway, the noxious and fatal results of many treatments are systemic and show up over time and the owners do not even know the real cause.”

    This is such a good point. This is why I believe we need to pressue the industry not to push the vet RX foods on us, and every new drug that gets promo’d to them at their conferences. It is impossible to get satisfaction seeking justice for a pet that died over a long time from prescribed ingestion of vet RX food or drugs.

    Re:
    2) I don’t expect vets to be SAINTS - I do expect them not to be MURDERERS.

    I actually expect more than that they merely not be murderers. I expect them to be competent and kind. I believe I have a right to that. But I have learned this is not the majority.

    3) And I don’t expect to pay someone even one cent for misleading me and harming my pet.

    I do agree with you. I think that some of the vets just mindless push the crap that “Hills” and the other big veterinary names market to them. Others TRULY BUY the marketing gimmicks, and believe they are doing something good when the script it out to you. Problem is, they get so defensive and pushy when you say, “No, thanks . .. ” and god forbid you tell them you are feeding raw or home cooked. As for meds, again, I think most vets are just not critically assessing these drugs, OR they truly buy the marketing the pharma’s push. The sinister few probably DO know it’s harmful and don’t care.

    4) the time to check things out is WAY before you ever write the check. This means being proactive and reading on alternative sources about the dangers likely to be encountered and the alternatives to exposing your animal to them.

    I agree. But why do so many of us have to learn this the hard way?

    Because so many just — TRUST, blindly, they TRUST vets. They think the “kindly” vet would never steer them wrong. And that is a myth that dies very hard and painfully.

    I agree with you, of course. How do we get the message out and inspire healthy skepticism among pet owners?

    Stefani
    The Toonces Project
    http://www.TheTooncesProject.com
    “Is Your Pet Safe at the Vet?”

    http://www.jugglingcats.com/ve....._board.htm

  19. Stefani says:

    PS — Re: Veterinary Disciplinary Records

    If you live in Maryland, Virginia, or Texas, I have the some recent disciplinary records from the last 2-3 years on my website.

    However, it DOES NOT mean your vet doesn’t have a record if you don’t see their name there. It simply means it wasn’t in the last couple of years.

    You would want to contact hte board to pull records further back than that.

    For Maryland, go here:

    http://www.thetooncesproject.c.....yland.html

    For Virginia, go here:

    http://www.thetooncesproject.c.....ginia.html

    (Note this is just 2005-2006; needs to be updated w/2007 but you can also query VA site directly)

    For Texas go here:

    http://www.thetooncesproject.c.....texas.html

    I’d have more states but it’s labor intensive. Someday!

    Stefani


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